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Summer is here and the kids are out of school. If your kids are like mine, you won’t make it past the third day before you hear the dreaded words, “I’m BORED.” My wife tells the kids that “only boring people get bored.” The kids don’t like it, but the truth is, sometimes letting the kids be bored will encourage them to use their imagination to find something fun to do. Of course, no matter how creative they get, at some point, you are going to need some ideas for ways to pass the time. If you find yourself out of ideas and looking for some fun, free (or super cheap) activities to do with your kids this summer, we hope this list helps get you started.
 

1)     Go to a playground! There are lots of great playgrounds around town. Our favorite is the Kid Venture playground by the civic center, where you can take a break to feed the ducks and go on nature walks around the pond. We also love the Veterans Memorial Park in Pendleton with all its great climbing opportunities and abundant shade.


 

2)     The Splash Pad at Carolina Wren Park. Check the website for the times. (http://downtownandersonsc.com/carolina-wren-park/)

 

 

3)     Movies Under the Stars at Wren Park. On select Friday evenings, Wren Park will become a movie theater, showing your favorite family-friendly films. Pack your chairs and blankets and spend an evening under the stars. (http://downtownandersonsc.com/carolina-wren-park/)


 

4)     Michael’s Camp Creativity – Michael’s is offering you seven weeks of screen-free, creative fun. Children 3 and up can make a craft for $3. Classes are offered Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. (https://www.michaels.com/camp-creativity)

 

 

5)     Home Depot Building Workshops- your kids can learn to swing a hammer, follow directions, paint and create at Home Depot’s building workshops for kids. These classes are free and every kids gets a craft to take home and a badge to iron on their Home Depot apron. (https://www.homedepot.com/workshops/#store/1105)

 

 

6)     Mouse Hunt- Take your kiddos on a search for the Carolina Wrens downtown. See if you can find them all! (https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/b19bc7_4db6c8b188b44f1c92dc5ea714230cd0.pdf)


 

7)     AmStar Movies – Every Tuesday and Wednesday morning, AmStar theater offers $4 kids movies. Each child gets a popcorn and drink and enjoys the movie of the week. (https://www.amstarcinemas.com/skf)

 

 

8)     Bowling – When you need a break from the oppressive heat, the bowling alley offers a couple of hours of air conditioned fun. Check the website for summer specials. (https://boulevardlanesanderson.com/jr-rock-n-bowl)


 

9)     Library Story Time- Babies, toddlers and pre-schoolers will love the interactive story times at the Anderson County Library. They offer several times a week for different age groups. Make sure you take some books home to read, too!(http://www.andersonlibrary.org/events/events-for-kids/storytime-schedule/)

 

10)  Anderson Museum Events – The museum hosts a variety of different activities throughout summer and school year. Check their website for upcoming events. (https://andersoncountymuseum.org/dinosaur-club/)


 

11)  Anderson Mall KidsX Club – This kids club inspires children to explore the world through arts, crafts, educational experiences and playful activities. (https://kidxclub.com/)

Maybe you’ve heard of dental sealants before, but aren’t quite sure what they are or what they do. For many, sealants can be the hero of their oral health story, offering added protection from dental caries and helping ensure your child has better oral health. 

Dental sealants are made of a thin plastic material that is placed on the occlusal surface, or chewing surface of your child’s permanent molars and premolars. This plastic coating acts as a protective barrier from the bacteria and acids that contribute to tooth decay.

While the process of applying sealants and quick and painless, the results are real and long-lasting. Sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars. According to the CDC, “school-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants.”

Sealants can’t and won’t take the place of thorough brushing and flossing, which helps remove food particles and plaque from the smooth surfaces of teeth, but they can add extra protection for the grooved and pitted areas, where food and plaque often get stuck. The earlier your child receives sealants, the more beneficial they will be. By protecting the grooves, fissures and hard to reach areas of their back teeth, you can prevent dental decay from ever starting.

To learn more about sealants, how they are applied and how they may benefit your child, we recommend visiting the American Academy Dental Association’s website.

While we can’t reverse dental decay, sealants are a great way to prevent it. If you have questions about sealants, would like to schedule an appointment for your child, or are looking for a pediatric dentist for your child in the Anderson, SC area, call our office today at 864-760-1440. Let us give you and your child Something to Smile About!

 

 

Spring has sprung. And while the weather may not have gotten the memo just yet, warm weather is on the way. With warmer weather and longer daylight hours, come spring sports and more time spent playing outside. As you gear up for your next practice or game, don’t forget your child’s mouthguard!

Each year, about 5 million Americans lose teeth in sports-related injuries. Approximately 39% of all dental injuries are sports-related. (https://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/dental-injury-handout.pdf). These injuries can include avulsed teeth (complete displacement), cracked teeth, fractured roots and tooth intrusion (displacement of the tooth into the alveolar bone), as well as fractured crowns and lip and cheek injuries.

But, playing sports doesn’t have to give your child a hockey-player smile. Using a mouthguard can significantly reduce your child’s risk of obtaining a dental injury. Children playing any contact sports, such as field hockey, ice hockey, football, boxing and lacrosse are required to wear mouthguards. But the American Academy of Pediatric Dentists recommends that children wear mouthguards for most sports, including: baseball, basketball, soccer, softball, wrestling, volleyball and gymnastics, acrobatics, boxing, discus throwing, handball, martial arts, racquetball, rugby, shot putting, skateboarding, skiing, skydiving, squash, surfing, volleyball, water polo, and wrestling. According to the AAPD (click here to read full article), baseball and basketball have been shown to have the highest number of sports-related dental injuries in children between that ages of seven to 17 years. Baseball had the highest incident of dental injuries within the seven to 12 year-old age group and basketball led the way between the 13-17 year-old age group.

A mouthguard may be especially important for those with braces or dental work, but they are a great idea for anyone wanting to protect their teeth from potential trauma. Mouthguards act as a buffer for potential damage, but also provide a barrier between teeth/braces and cheeks, or between lips and tongue, which can limit soft tissue damage, as well.

Dental mouthguards are classified into three types:

1)     Stock mouthguards - can be purchased in sporting goods and drug stores, come pre-formed and ready to wear.
 

2)     Boil-and-bite mouthguards - most commonly used, these mouthguards are immersed in boiling water and formed in the mouth by using finger, tongue, and biting pressure.
 

3)     Custom-made mouth guards - designed by your dentist and are the best fitting and offer most protection and comfort.

All three types of mouthguards provide different levels of protection, but also come at different price-points. You should discuss your options with your pediatric dentist to determine which option will fit your needs best. Whatever your child’s sport and whatever your budget, there is a mouthguard option available. Don’t sacrifice the safety of your child’s smile. Wear a mouthguard!

If you have questions, or would like to discuss which mouth protection option is best for your child, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry is here to help. Call our office today at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

 

https://www.aapd.org/research/oral-health-policies--recommendations/prevention-of-sports-related-orofacial-injuries/

(https://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/dental-injury-handout.pdf)

https://www.dentalcare.com/en-us/professional-education/ce-courses/ce127/statistics

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/dental-emergencies-and-sports-safety/three-kinds-of-tooth-injury-that-occur-in-sports-1015

Did you know that one in 12 Americans suffers from asthma? That number seems alarming and a little difficult to believe, but the prevalence of asthma is increasing every year. Ironically, asthma and childhood caries (cavities) are the two most prevalent childhood diseases.

Most people diagnosed with asthma will begin using an inhaler, either as a rescue option or preventative treatment, or both. If you or your child uses an inhaler, you may have heard suggestions that inhalers cause cavities or that children with asthma have more dental problems.

The truth is that asthma and inhalers will not cause cavities.  However, the two are often linked because, they may make your child’s mouth more susceptible to conditions that allow cavity-causing bacteria to thrive. The good news is that these concerns can be easily managed and your child will not have to choose between a beautiful smile or breathing freely.

1) Dry Mouth
Typically, those suffering from respiratory problems, such as asthma and allergies, suffer from restricted air flow, causing them to breathe through their mouth, rather than their nose. Mouth breathing has been linked with dry mouth and less saliva.


Saliva is key to washing away debris and fighting bacteria, so when your mouth is dry, it’s easier for plaque-causing bacteria to reproduce, increasing the chances of bad breath, tooth decay and gum disease. In addition, some medications in the inhalers can also have a drying effect on your mouth.
 

2) Mouth Sores
Regular use of the inhaler can sometimes lead to sores or ulcers on the back roof of the child’s mouth if the medications irritate the skin.

 

What You Can Do:
 

A little vigilance will go a long way. Follow these easy steps below to ensure that your child’s treatments aren’t damaging their teeth.

1) Rinse and Brush.
After using the inhaler, be sure that your child rinses his or her mouth with water. Brushing is even better.

 

2) Water, water, water.
Keep your child hydrated with water throughout the day to counteract the effects of a dry mouth.
 

3) Talk to your dentist.
Make sure to tell your child’s dentist about his or her asthma, medications and concerns. Your pediatric dentist can recommend strategies for maintain your child’s oral health.
 

4) Treat allergies.
Asthma and allergies often come together. Constantly having a stuffy nose will cause a child to breathe through their mouth, too, causing dry mouth. Proper treatment of allergies can alleviate the need to breathe through their mouth as often, enabling the child’s saliva to help fight off plaque-causing bacteria.

Remember, asthma isn’t a prescription, or excuse, for cavities. With a few simple preventative measures, your child can maintain his or her oral health and ensure a beautiful smile for life. If you have questions or concerns about your child’s teeth, or you are looking for a dental home for your child, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry would love to give you Something to Smile About! Call our office today at 864-760-1440.

 

https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/asthma/index.html

 

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/asthma.html

By Anderson Pediatric Dentistry
June 22, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: dental exam  
CouldADentalCheckupSaveYourLife

Most everyone knows that going to see your dentist for regular checkups and cleanings can help save your smile — but did you ever stop to think that it just might save your life?

That's what recently happened to 11-year-old Journee Woodard of Edmond, Oklahoma. The young girl was having a routine teeth cleaning when hygienist Rachel Stroble noticed something unusual: The whites of her eyes (her sclera) had a distinctly yellow tint. Dr. Michael Chandler, Journee’s dentist, confirmed the hygienist’s suspicions, and advised her mom to take her for further testing. The tests revealed that Journee had a tumor covering parts of her pancreas, gallbladder and liver; it could have ruptured at any moment, with devastating consequences.

The tumor was removed three days later in a 9-hour operation, and Journee is now recovering. As for her dentist, Dr. Chandler told reporters that he and his staff were just doing their jobs thoroughly. “It's hard to feel like I’m a hero,” he said (though others might disagree).

Is this a one-in-a-million case? Maybe — yet for many people, a family dentist may be the health care professional who is seen more often than any other. That can put dentists in the unique position of being able to closely monitor not only a person’s oral health, but also their overall health.

There are several reasons why that’s so. One is that most systemic diseases (such as diabetes, leukemia, and heart disease, for example) can have oral manifestations — that is, symptoms that show up in the mouth. If your dentist notices something unusual, further testing may be recommended. Dentists also regularly screen for diseases specific to the mouth — such as oral cancer, which has a much better chance of being cured when it is caught at an early stage.

But beyond checking for particular diseases, dentists often notice other things that may indicate a health issue. For example, if you complain of dry mouth or snoring, and appear fatigued in the dental chair, your dentist may suspect undiagnosed sleep apnea: a potentially serious condition. Many other signs — such as yellowed eyes, a pounding heart rate, or shortness of breath — can indicate potential problems.

Of course, we’re not even mentioning the main reason for regular dental checkups — keeping your smile healthy and bright; for many people that’s reason enough. How does Journee’s mom feel about keeping dental appointments? “I will never miss another dentist appointment,” she told reporters. “I will never reschedule.”

If you would like more information about routine dental checkups, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Dental Hygiene Visit” and “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”