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Posts for tag: teething

This month, our family will celebrate our youngest daughter turning two. It’s a bit ironic to celebrate a toddler turning two, as we all know that the terrible twos are anything but something to celebrate! But, along with the tantrums, defiance and unpredictability, two-year-olds also have some major milestones to look forward to. Getting their two-year-old molars is just one milestone that comes during this crazy year!

So, when will your child get his or her two-year-old molars? Do these teeth serve a purpose? And how can you care for your child during the teething and their new teeth once they arrive? Let’s find out!

The two-year-old molars are also referred to as second molars. They are the large, flat teeth at the very back of your child’s mouth. Their primary use is for grinding food. As your child grows and begins to eat more types of foods, these teeth are especially helpful for chewing and digestion.

Two-year molars usually arrive sometime between 23 and 33 months. Typically, the lower set will arrive fist, around 23 to 31 months, with the upper set following closely after around 25 to 33 months.

While I would love to tell you that they will arrive unnoticed, chances are, your child will experience some sort of teething symptoms, such as pain/ tenderness, irritability and crankiness. They may even have a low-grade fever. This is normal and to be expected, as these molars are large, and must force their way up through the gums, which is not always a pleasant experience.

Most two-year-olds are not able to identify the pain as “teething” and won’t be able to tell you what is wrong. You can help your child during this time by being aware of the symptoms and ready to help your child cope. Signs that your child is getting his or her second molars include:

-        Increased chewing on toys, fingers or clothing

-        Drooling more than normal

-        Irritability and crankiness

-        More nighttime fussiness, as they are less distracted and more focused on the pain

-        Low grade rectal temperature

(Please note that teething will not cause a high fever. If your child experiences a high fever, you should seek medical attention, as this is not caused by teething.)

 

 

Just like when your child got his or her first tooth, there are ways to help alleviate the pain and fussiness. Once you recognize the symptoms of teething, help your child through a rough few days by using these simple soothers:

 

-        Give the child a cold, wet wash cloth soaked in ice water

-        Offer teething toys for chewing

-        Distract your child with singing, coloring, building, dancing, etc.

-        Administer children’s Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen to help reduce discomfort for 1 or 2 days.
(pain that lasts longer than a couple of days needs to be evaluated by your pediatrician.)

-        Apply moisturizers to the skin around the mouth to prevent dryness caused by drooling.

 

Remember, teething only lasts a few days and your child will be back to his or her happy, active self. Once those two-year-old molars are in, be sure to take care of them with daily care!

If you have questions about your child’s oral development or you are looking for a dentist for your child, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry would love top be your dental home! Call our office at 864-760-1440 and let is give you Something to Smile About!

When our children are infants, their baby teeth are a BIG deal. We spend hours consoling them as they drool and gnaw on their hands during the teething process. We mark the date of their first tooth’s arrival in their baby books. We get just as excited as they do the first time they get to put their tooth under their pillow and eagerly await the tooth fairy.

So, why then, do many people feel like baby teeth aren’t as important as permanent teeth? The answer is right in that one word- permanent. Because we know that our “big” teeth are meant to last for life, we somehow get the idea that our children’s baby teeth, that we know they will lose at some point, must not be that important. After all, they get replaced, right?

Wrong! Baby teeth, despite their small stature and their shorter life span, serve many important roles in your child’s long-term oral health and development.

Promote good nutrition through proper chewing
Just as adult, or permanent, teeth do, the baby teeth serve the important role of biting, gnashing and chewing our food so that our bodies can readily digest the nutrients. Missing or painful baby teeth can make the child hesitant to eat certain foods which can cause them to lose out on much-needed nutrients.

Serve as space holders for the permanent teeth and provide a path for permanent teeth to follow when they are ready to erupt
Baby teeth are essentially a road map for the permanent teeth to follow, and when removed prematurely, before the permanent tooth is ready to erupt, it can cause long-term problems, even changing the structure of the child’s jaw bone and face. The permanent teeth may come in improperly, or possibly not at all, and your child could require orthodontic treatment to correct the problem.

Build self-esteem by providing a beautiful smile
Children naturally love to smile and find joy in the world. Beautiful baby teeth help them to do so. Even a young child can begin to feel self-conscious of missing or decayed teeth.

Enable the child to pay attention and learn in school without the distraction of dental pain.
It’s simple. Healthy teeth don’t hurt. In fact, kids don’t even think about their teeth when they are healthy. However, decayed teeth can cause a lot of pain! This pain can prevent them from getting adequate sleep, interrupt their day, and be distractive, preventing your child from excelling at school.

So, while it’s tempting to skip brushing your young child’s teeth when life gets busy, remember these small teeth play a BIG role in your child’s oral health and development. And remember, the care and importance that you give to their baby teeth will influence how they take care of their teeth on their own.

Taking care of your young child’s teeth can be simple. Follow these rules and help your child’s smile shine bright.

1)     Start brushing as soon as your child gets his or her first tooth. Brush twice a day, even if it’s just for a short amount of time.

2)     Floss any teeth that touch.

3)     Limit sugary drinks, even juice.

4)     Don’t go to bed with any drinks other than water.

5)     Model good oral health by taking care of your own teeth! Kids learn by watching their parents.

6)     Schedule an appointment with a pediatric dentist within six months of the arrival of their first tooth, or by their one-year old     birthday. Early prevention and monitoring, as well as education about good oral health, will help prevent problems.

 

As always, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to be your go-to resource for helping to educate parents and children alike, and giving all children the beautiful smiles that they deserve. If you are looking for a dental home for your child, give us a call at 864-760-1440, and let us give you Something to Smile About!

By Anderson Pediatric Dentistry
April 23, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teething  
EaseYourChildsDiscomfortDuringTeething

Your sweet, happy baby has suddenly become a gnawing, drooling bundle of irritation. Don't worry, though, no one has switched babies on you. Your child is teething.

For most children, their first teeth begin breaking through the gums around six to nine months. Usually by age three all twenty primary (“baby”) teeth have erupted. While the duration and intensity of teething differs among children, there are some common symptoms to expect.

Top of the list, of course, is irritability from pain, discomfort and disrupted sleep. You'll also notice increased gnawing, ear rubbing, decreased appetite, gum swelling or facial rash brought on by increased saliva (drooling). Teething symptoms seem to increase about four days before a tooth begins to break through the gums and taper off about three days after.

You may occasionally see bluish swellings along the gums known as eruption cysts. These typically aren't cause for concern:  the cyst usually “pops” and disappears as the tooth breaks through it. On the other hand, diarrhea, body rashes or fever are causes for concern — if these occur you should call us or your pediatrician for an examination.

While teething must run its course, there are some things you can do to minimize your child's discomfort:

Provide them a clean, soft teething ring or pacifier to gnaw or chew — a wet washcloth (or a cold treat for older children) may also work. Chill it first to provide a pain-reducing effect, but don't freeze it — that could burn the gums.

Use a clean finger to massage swollen gums — gently rubbing the gums helps counteract the pressure caused by an erupting tooth.

Alleviate persistent pain with medication — With your doctor's recommendation, you can give them a child's dosage of acetaminophen or ibuprofen (not aspirin), to take the edge off teething pain.

There are also things you should not do, like applying rubbing alcohol to the gums or using products with Benzocaine®, a numbing agent, with children younger than two years of age. Be sure you consult us or a physician before administering any drugs.

While it isn't pleasant at the time, teething is part of your child's dental development. With your help, you can ease their discomfort for the relatively short time it lasts.

If you would like more information on relieving discomfort during teething, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”

It’s one of those major milestones that we can’t wait to celebrate with our baby. We wait months for it. And then it starts and we can’t wait for it to be over. Yes, I am talking about teething! Whether it’s the first tooth or the eighth, teething can be awful, for both the baby and the parents. From the constant drool to the fussiness and even the lack of sleep, teething can be painful- both physically and emotionally.

While every child is different, most babies will begin cutting their first tooth between 4 to 7 months and will have a full mouth of teeth by 2 to 3 years of age. What does this mean? You guessed it? The teething fun can last for years! The best part is that teething is different for each child, and even for each tooth. Your child might get his first tooth without any symptoms, but cry and drool for days when his molars come in. Or, your baby might drool and fuss for weeks when the first tooth arrives, then have no further discomfort when future teeth arrive.

For my oldest daughter, she screamed and fussed all morning long, then seemed to stop immediately after her first tooth came through. She never had any issues with any of the other teeth. With our son, he drooled nonstop for a month before his first tooth came through. And our youngest daughter wouldn’t eat solid food for nearly two days before her bottom molar came in.

Teething has many symptoms- excessive drooling, fussiness, lack of appetite. There are also some symptoms that many attribute to teething, but there is no medical evidence to support it.

For example, fevers. My wife swears that each of our children had a mild fever when teething. So, did the teething cause the fever or was it just a coincidence- three times? There are mixed opinions on this. Many pediatricians disagree that it’s related to teething and that the fever is probably due to some other infection or illness going on at the same time. Remember, at this age, a baby’s passive immunity due to maternal antibodies wanes and exposure to a wide variety of childhood illnesses occurs, often causing mild fever. Regardless, if your child experiences any fever over 101.4 while teething, you need to visit your pediatrician to make sure there is not an underlying illness causing it.

Diarrhea. While there is no scientific evidence linking loose stools and teething, this too, makes some sense. Many babies tend to have excessive drool when they are teething. For some, this goes on for days and even weeks. Some doctors believe that the excessive amounts of saliva can, in fact, be a factor in your child’s loose stools. However, many infants at this age are also starting solid foods and their diet is changing, which can also lead to diarrhea. In any case, if it seems excessive or if you see any blood in the stools, contact your pediatrician, as this is likely due to something other than teething.

So, what’s a parent to do? How can you save your baby from pain and yourself from losing your sanity? There are many teething-pain relievers that can soothe your baby's sore gums safely. Here are a few worth trying:

Chew Toys- plastic and rubber toys are great for soothing aching gums, especially when chilled. Choose the solid teething toys over the fluid filled ones and do not freeze them, as this can be too hard for baby’s gums.

Cold- Damp washcloths can be twisted and frozen. Tie one end in a knot to give baby something to gnaw on. (This also eliminates any exposure to chemicals in plastic teething toys.)

Massage- A light, gentle rub or massage might give your little one a lot of relief. Remember to wash your hands. Also, babies like to gnaw on your clean fingers, too. Remember, they don’t have teeth yet so it won’t hurt.

Medicine- When your baby is having a really tough time, ask your pediatrician about giving a dose of acetaminophen (Tylenol).

Note: Numbing gels or creams that contain benzocaine are not recommended for infants.

Essential Oils and Natural Remedies- While no scientific evidence exists to support the use of essential oils, many parents stand by their effectiveness and feel comforted by their natural ingredients. Whether using manufactured teething treatments or essential oils, make sure to follow guidelines on dilution and use sparingly. Before six months, stick to lavender and chamomile.


What NOT to do.

There are many tried and true methods for easing teething pain. However, the one thing we advise parents against is putting any type of teething necklace around your child’s neck, including the popular Amber necklaces. Without going too deep into this issue, there is currently no scientific data to support the claims that these necklaces ease teething pain or drooling. The risk of choking and strangulation is far to high to encourage the use of wearing these necklaces. In addition, many parents are purchasing fake necklaces that are not even made from real Baltic Amber. For more information, I encourage you to visit some of the websites listed below to see the research and data.

Remember, teething troubles won’t last forever and it leads to an exciting milestone! When your child has a mouthful of teeth and a beautiful smile, it will all be worth it!


https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/teething-tooth-care/Pages/Amber-Teething-Necklaces.aspx
 

https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/11/amber-teething-necklaces-pose-choking-hazard/
 

https://www.parenting.com/article/the-truth-about-teething-21332984

 

By Anderson Pediatric Dentistry
January 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health
KnowtheFactstoReduceYourChildsTeethingDiscomfort

The arrival of your child’s first set of teeth is a natural and expected process. But that doesn’t mean this period of development, commonly known as teething, is an easy time: your baby will endure a fair amount of discomfort, and you, perhaps, a bit of anxiety.

Knowing the facts about teething can help you reduce your child’s discomfort — as well as your own concern — to a minimum. Here are a few things you need to know.

Teething duration varies from child to child. Most children’s teeth begin to erupt (appear in the mouth) between six and nine months of age — however, some children may begin at three months and some as late as a year. The full eruption sequence is usually complete by age 3.

Symptoms and their intensity may also vary. As teeth gradually break through the gum line, your baby will exhibit some or all normal teething symptoms like gum swelling, drooling and chin rash (from increased saliva flow), biting or gnawing, ear rubbing, or irritability. You may also notice behavior changes like decreased appetite or disrupted sleep. These symptoms may be a minimal bother during some teething episodes, while at other times the pain and discomfort may seem intense. Symptoms tend to increase about four days before a tooth emerges through the gums and about three days afterward.

Diarrhea, rashes or fever aren’t normal. These symptoms indicate some other sickness or condition, which can easily be masked during a teething episode. If your child exhibits any of these symptoms you should call us for an exam to rule out a more serious issue.

Keep things cool to reduce discomfort. There are a few things you can do to reduce your child’s discomfort during a teething episode. Let your child chew on chilled (but not frozen) soft items like teething rings, wet washcloths or pacifiers to reduce swelling and pain. Gum massage with your clean finger may help counteract the pressure from the erupting tooth. And, if your doctor advises it, pain relievers in the proper dosage may also help alleviate discomfort. On the other hand, don’t use rubbing alcohol to soothe painful gums, or products with the numbing agent Benzocaine in children younger than two unless advised by a healthcare professional.

If you would like more information on dealing with teething issues, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”