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Posts for tag: sugar

April 16, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: brushing   dentist   Candy   sugar   teeth   Easter   fun facts   eggs   chocolate   jelly beans   bunnies   Peeps  

October 15, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: cavities   kids teeth   Candy   sugar   weight   crafts   Halloween   Calories   Recycle   Treats   Experiments   Smiles  

Halloween can be so much fun! It’s an event that seems to start at the beginning of the month and just keeps going. Between picking out costumes, carving pumpkins, attending trunk or treat and other Halloween events, Halloween night is often just one of many celebrations. And while it’s fun for kids and parents alike to get dressed up and have fun, the constant influx of candy and sugar can leave us with some not so wanted “treats.”

Calories. As much as we wish they didn’t count, the truth is, they do. The average child will consume 3,500-7,000 calories on Halloween! You read it right. 7,000 calories is the same at 13 Big Macs!

Now, take this amount and think about how many calories your child will consume if you allow the candy binge to go on for days or weeks! It’s not just their teeth that will be affected. This onslaught of sugar and calories will affect your child’s blood sugar, behavior, weight and overall feelings of well-being. That is definitely not a fun trick or treat!

Candy. It’s all about the candy! We know. We get it. We remember being little and competing to see who could fill up a pillowcase of candy. But, let’s be honest. Who needs a pillowcase of candy? Most of the time, half the candy collected is candy your child doesn’t even like. So, why hang on to it and tempt them to eat it? Besides, there are so many better things to do with your candy than eat it!

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to share some insights and tips for how your family can make Halloween more about the fun and less about the candy.

 

Our suggestions:
 

-        Make trick-or-treating about the actual event and the fun of the night, not about the candy.

-        Immediately sort the candy and pull out sticky, sour or gummy treats. Chocolate candies melt off the teeth easier and won’t cling to the teeth as long. Go ahead and get rid of all the stuff your child doesn’t like so they aren’t tempted to eat it just because it’s there!

-        Allow your child to enjoy their candy for a day or two, and then trash it, or consider donating it or participating in a candy buy-back so that your child can trade their sugar for cash!

-        Recycle. If the thought of throwing away bags of candy leaves you feeling wasteful, consider ways to recycle the candy and use it for fun activities other than eating.

Check out Pinterest and other sites for great candy crafts and science experiments. With names like “the incredible growing gummy worm” and the “density rainbow,” kids will engage their minds and learn, all while using up their candy.

-        Focus on the fun, not the candy. Make the emphasis on dressing up, painting faces, carving pumpkins and other pre-Halloween events so that candy is just a small part of the whole evening. 

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wishes everyone a fun and safe Halloween, full of fun, good times and lots of healthy smiles! 

 

Sports drinks, such as Gatorade and Powerade are made for replenishing lost electrolytes, glucose and sodium after strenuous activity. They are refreshing, taste good and seem like a good choice for active, hot kids and adults, alike. These drinks are sold everywhere and consumed by the masses, many times, not even during athletic activity.

 

The problem is that these drinks were originally designed for carbohydrate replacement for athletes and for use in strenuous activity, which most people are not doing on a regular basis. In fact, these drinks are often consumed by people in a sedentary setting. They are loaded in sugar- lots of sugar. A 12 ounce serving can have 21 grams of sugar, and most people drink more than 12 ounces! Considering that the American Heart Association recommends that adult women get no more than 25grams of added sugar and adult men get no more than 36 grams, that’s almost a full days worth of the recommended amount of added sugar for women, and more than half the recommended amount for men, all in one serving of a sports drink! And we all know that most people will drink the full bottle, not just one serving.

 

Very few adults, much less kids, are participating in any activity that requires replenishing the body’s sodium and glucose. In most situations, water is the best choice. With no calories and no sugar, it allows the body to use exercise to burn energy, rather than replace a little bit of caloric loss with huge amounts of sugar and empty calories.

 

There are times when these sports drinks are appropriate, and possibly beneficial. A report from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that those engaging in less than 60-90 minutes of exercise are better off sticking to water. For those taking part in prolonged, vigorous physical activities for more than one hour, and especially in hot temperatures when electrolyte imbalance and dehydration are a concern, a sports drink may be better than water. (https://www.issuelab.org/resources/18583/18583)

 

The use of sports drinks, as well as other sugary energy drinks, when not engaged in strenuous activity, can have negative effects. Aside from the sugar contributing to tooth decay, the additional calories may also contribute to weight gain when the calories consumed in these high-sugar drinks are not being expended during the physical activity.

 

When in doubt, choose water. It’s better for your teeth and better for your body! Stick to drinking sports drinks only during strenuous, prolonged activity, and be aware of the total sugar in your diet.