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Posts for tag: pediatric

May 14, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: pediatric   anxiety   sedation   calming   medi  

For many people, especially young children, having a dental procedure done can cause a bit of anxiety. It makes sense. No one finds it extremely fun or comfortable to have someone else’s hands in their mouth, or hear the sound of a dental drill right by their ear. At Anderson Pediatric Dentistry, we try to alleviate as much fear and anxiety as possible by thoroughly explaining the procedure to both patient and parent. We know that a calm and friendly demeanor can go along way in gaining trust and we encourage the patient with positive engagement along the way.

For some patients, however, this may not be enough. And that’s okay. We understand! In the case of an anxious patient, or for longer procedures, it may be beneficial to offer our patients a mild sedative, or calming drug. Many times, this will be in the form of nitrous oxide.

What is nitrous oxide, and will it really make you laugh? Nitrous oxide is often called “laughing gas.” It’s a very safe and mild sedative that your child’s dentist will give to your child while they are seated in the dental chair. It’s administered through a face mask which carries oxygen and medication to your child as they breathe. Your child will be asked to breathe through his or her nose, rather than their mouth and the sedation will take place within a few minutes. Your child will remain awake and coherent throughout the entire procedure, but the nitrous oxide will help them remain calm and relaxed and probably give them a “happy” feeling. Once the procedure is complete, the gas will be turned off and your child will continue to breathe pure oxygen for several minutes to clear the out any remaining gas from their system.

Why use any sedation?

Sedation may be used to manage special needs or anxiety, especially when several procedures need to be completed at the same time, if the safety of the child is compromised due to them moving or struggling, or even when a child has a strong gag reflex. While the sedation medication will not control pain or discomfort, it will allow your child’s dentist to provide the anesthetic shots to numb the area, work safely and more quickly on your child and ease your child’s anxiety so that he or she has a better experience in the dental chair.

Use of sedation medication during pediatric dental visits can be a helpful tool that will allow your child to have a better experience at the dentist and help set them up for a better relationship with the dentist for life. By avoiding negative experiences and bad memories at the dentist, you are helping pave the road for better oral care for life. And that’s definitely Something to Smile About!

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to give you and your child Something to Smile About! Call us today at 864-760-1440 to schedule an appointment for your child today!

It’s the day of the year when people come together to celebrate their Irish descent. Towns go green, literally- from green clothes to green rivers and even green food and beverages. The ironic part is that most of the people celebrating aren’t even Irish and don’t even know who St. Patrick was, (Click here to learn about St. Patrick) but that doesn’t stop people from being “Irish for the day.” It is, after all, a really fun holiday.

According to CNBC, emergency dental visits skyrocket by 77% the day after St. Patrick’s Day. The information was gleaned from analysis from Sikka Software, which found that March 18 is consistently one of the busiest 10 days of the year for dentist. It goes without saying that alcohol plays a large role in this spike, with bar fights and face plants being responsible for many of the chipped or missing teeth cases that dentist will see. Apparently, some people take the term “fighting Irish” a bit too far.

Luckily for Anderson Pediatric Dentistry, most of our patients won’t be involved in the more extreme St. Patrick’s Day shenanigans. However, we thought it was a great time to review what to do if your luck runs out and you find yourself facing a dental emergency. Remember, sometimes the tooth can be saved if handled appropriately.

 

We encourage you to become familiar with the information below so that you will know what to do if you find yourself faced with a dental trauma.

 

If a tooth is knocked out:

 

1) Pick the tooth up by the crown (the part you bite with) and DO NOT touch the root (the two little legs that go in the gums).

 

2) Adults and older children that have knocked out a permanent tooth, gently rinse it in clean water and place it back in the socket the right way. Apply gauze and pressure to hold it in place until getting to the dentist office. 

 

If you are unsure of the proper placement, you can place the tooth in your cheek and hold it there until getting to the dentist office. The saliva will clean the root and keep it moist.

 

For small children and baby teeth, do not place the tooth back in the socket. This can damage the permanent tooth below. Since most small children cannot hold the tooth in their cheek without swallowing it, placing it in a container of milk and heading to the dentist office is the best option. Make sure to bring the tooth with you. (If the parent is comfortable doing so, he or she can place it in his/her own cheek to keep it moist and in saliva.)

 

Remember, we want to keep the tooth moist. Saliva is the best option, followed by milk. Do not wrap the tooth in a napkin and allow it to dry.

 

3) Call our office and let us know you are on the way! You need to see the dentist as soon as possible for the best chance at saving the tooth.

 

 

What to do if a tooth is chipped:

 

If a tooth is chipped, try to find any pieces that have come off, as sometimes it’s possible to reattach them. Make an appointment for an office visit as soon as possible and bring the pieces with you.

 

Anytime there is a severe injury, loss of consciousness or uncontrollable bleeding, seek help immediately from the Emergency Room.  For less traumatic injuries, call our office at 864-760-1440 to schedule a time to be seen as soon as possible. Often, a quick phone conversation can help us to determine the next step. Cheers!

 

A pediatric dentist advising you to give your child dark chocolate instead of the ever-popular fish-shaped crackers? It sounds crazy, right? Well, this post is the "Eat this, not that" for your teeth. And I will explain why. Just keep reading.

More and more, we are seeing the connection between diet and nutrition and overall health. As one might guess, this applies to your oral health, too. In fact, simple changes in your child’s diet may be the answer to keeping cavities away.

Cavities are caused when cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth feeds off simple sugars and causes acid plaque. This plaque attacks the enamel of the tooth and causes it to soften and eventually creates holes, or cavities in the tooth.

So, we know that sugar sitting on your teeth is not a good thing. It would make sense to choose foods that we feel are low in sugar. And this does help. But, it turns out, there’s more to it. In fact, it’s not just the amount of sugar that matters when we are trying to avoid cavities. There are actually three factors that impact the way food affects your teeth:

1)     Stickiness

2)     Sugar concentration

3)     Frequency

 

Stickiness- Not all foods are created equal. Flour seems to be the culprit behind a food’s stickiness. Think about it this way, when you eat an apple or baby carrots, there’s no food clinging to your teeth. When you eat crackers or pretzels, you will have food debris sticking to your teeth. Any food or sugar remaining on the teeth becomes a breeding ground for cavity-causing bacteria.


Sugar concentration- It makes sense that food lower in sugars are better for your teeth (and your body). But, contrary to popular belief, the amount of sugar is not the full story. In fact, it appears that when it comes to dental caries (cavities), it is the sugar concentration more than the actual amount, that actually matters.

This concept is pretty mind-blowing and also pretty important to understand! Basically, when choosing between foods that have the same amount of simple sugars, you can make a better choice for your teeth by choosing the one that also contains fat- or more fat. Why? Dr. Roger Lucas, DDS, explains it well when he says, “When you take away fat, you are indirectly increasing the concentration of sugar.”

Why does the concentration matter? A 2014 in vitro study* that found that whole milk is not acidic enough to demineralize enamel, but skim milk can demineralize enamel. This study confirmed that it is the concentration of sugars in the foods we choose, more than the amount of sugar, that contributes to dental caries.

By taking the fat out of a food, you are raising the sugar concentration. Fat doesn’t cause cavities. Sugars and starches do. So, you want to pick the food that has the lower sugar concentration, not necessarily the lowest sugar content.

What’s an example of choosing a better snack option? Swap snacks like Goldfish crackers for dark chocolate (at least 70%). This sounds crazy, but when you look at the two snacks, you see that while they have similar sugar content, dark chocolate has a higher fat content, and thus a lower sugar concentration. It also sticks to the teeth less, offers antioxidants, and parents are far less likely to allow their child to walk around eating dark chocolate bars all day long, like we often do with crackers and other easily portable snacks.
 

Frequency- Each time you eat or drink, the teeth are attacked for about 20 minutes, until the saliva has time to neutralize the acids and wash the bacteria away. Limiting the times this happens throughout the day can decrease the damage done to the teeth. This is especially true when children are snacking on crackers, sticky fruit chews and other common snack foods constantly throughout the day.

Other great options are nuts, cheese, crunchy vegetables and fruits, meats and yogurt. While most fruits anad vegetables have virtually no fat content, they also don't stick to your child's teeth and can be easily washed awayw ith water after eating. Remember, it's a combination fo the stickiness, the sugar content and the frequency of eating that cause cavities.

The truth of it is, diet and nutrition should be your first line of defense for healthy teeth. Brushing, flossing and fluoride should be the second.

Your oral health is not something that has to be left to chance. Good nutrition and good oral healthcare, along with regular checkups with your pediatric dentist, can keep the cavities away! Come let Anderson Pediatric Dentistry give you and your child Something to Smile About!
 

*(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24717697)

 

 

Battle of the Binkie

Paci, pappy, binky, dummy, soother, nuk nuk. No matter what you call it, these little bits of plastic and silicone have a way of running our lives. How many of you have turned the car around to go get the baby’s pacifier? Have you ever had to leave a store or dinner because you didn’t have one? Do you keep multiple backups in each room of your home? I’ll admit it. We do it at my home. When we get in the car, the first thing my wife and I ask each other is, “Did you get a paci?”

 

Yes, these little lifesavers have a way of taking over. And while they can be useful, developmentally appropriate, and valuable to many babies, there comes a time when we, as parents, have to take control back. We have to help our children develop alternate ways of soothing themselves and alternate coping mechanisms that don’t involve “plugging” them up when they get fussy or loud.

 

It’s not an easy task. Believe me. I know. I am about to embark on the dreadful few days of adjustment myself. You see, my youngest daughter is about to be 18 months old. This arbitrary age is the age that we agreed to lose the paci. Now that the day is looming just a week away, I have to admit that I am having second thoughts! Because we are preparing for the worst possible few days of adjustment, I figured it was a good time to cover this topic, share some educational information and possibly, get some tips from our families about how they have successfully battled the binkie.

 

Why use a pacifier at all? There are mixed opinions about introducing a pacifier to young infants and whether it should even be done at all. Some babies refuse to even take one. However, there are some beneficial reasons for allowing your baby to have a pacifier. Most recognized is its soothing effect. Babies naturally use their sucking mechanism to self-soothe. A pacifier can offer a non-nutritive means of self-soothing, rather than always offering a bottle or breast. Pacifiers have also been linked to lower risk for SIDS. And, of course, pacifiers are used for the obvious reason- to pacify a crying baby. For many, pacifiers are a psychological security for the child.

 

Can pacifiers cause permanent problems? This answer is somewhat complicated because it really boils down to the age of the child using it, and the frequency and intensity. The general recommendation is that you need to limit a pacifier’s use after age 1 and try to be rid of it completely by age 3. By age 4, pacifiers can cause an overbite, open bite, cross bite and narrowed palate- even those labled as orthodontic-friendly. These problems can all negatively impact the child’s oral development, can cause problems with chewing, speech and appearance and can require orthodontics to correct.

 

The simple answer is that the earlier you get rid of the pacifier, the better, and easier it will be for the child. While a child that is three years old may be able to reason better and have a clearer understanding of what is happening, often a younger child will be able to move on quicker, with less of a fight. Also, by the time the child is two or three, you have other issues coming into play, such as potty training, preschool, etc., that may make it more difficult to take away their primary soothing mechanism. Ultimately, it will be up to you as the parent to decide when your child is ready to pass on the paci. The good news is that even limiting the frequency of use can help prevent some of the oral developmental problems listed above. If your child isn’t ready to totally give it up, we recommend limiting its use and not allowing your child to keep a pacifier in his or her mouth all day long.

 

If you are ready to lose the pacifier for good, here are a few tips that have helped parents successfully win in the battle of the binky.

 

  • Start gradually. Limit the pacifier to bedtime and only allow your child to have it in his or her crib or bed.

 

  • For children that are closer to 3, have a discussion with your child and explain that it’s time to get rid of the pacifier. You can reason with them and explain why the pacifier needs to go. Offer to replace it with something for “big kids.”

 

  • Replace the pacifier with a lovey or stuffed animal that your child can carry with them, sleep with and hold in the car. Anywhere the pacifier was previously used, the lovey or animal can go.

 

  • Read books about it with your child.

 

  • Refuse to buy more. When the last one is gone, they are gone.


     
  •  If you are feeling creative, use a pacifier fairy, to come pick up the pacifiers one night and leave a prize in their place. Pinterest has tons of great ideas about this topic. We even saw one about taking your older child to Build-a-Bear and letting them stuff all their pacifiers inside a bear so that they can feel like they still have them close by, but they get a new stuffed animal to soothe with instead.

 

  • Patience. Some children really do use the pacifier to soothe themselves, even at the age of 2. Be mindful that if your child is still truly soothing himself with the pacifier, taking it away abruptly may lead to other unwanted habits, such as thumb sucking. In these cases, it may be better to limit the time with the pacifier and begin introducing alternative soothing mechanisms before taking the pacifier away.

 

On a personal note, my wife and I have decided that our 18-month old is ready to ditch the paci. Yes, we will be going through the Battle of the Binky, too! While our daughter may not agree, she rarely uses it for sucking and only has it on car rides and in her crib. Our plan of action will be to only allow it in her crib at nap and bedtime. We will begin bringing her favorite bunny that she sleeps with in the car so that she has something to soothe herself with. Once she can get through the days without a paci, we will start putting her down for naps and bedtime without it, too.

 

So, with our daughter, we are gradually reducing her time with her pacifier. But, each child is different. With our son, around 18 months, we felt like his speech wasn’t progressing because he always walked around with his pacifier in his mouth. My wife decided after his 18-month pediatric visit, to take it away cold turkey. Of course, we had one in case it didn’t go well. But the amazing thing was, he never once cried for it or asked for it. All of our hesitation and fear was for nothing. (I realize this is rare, which is why we plan to slowly remove it from my daughter.)

 

Like anything with children, there are a million ideas, a millions ways to do it and a million people to tell you what you should do and how they would do it. When and how you take away your child’s pacifier is a personal decision. By the age of 3, many children will lose interest in the pacifier and almost all children that still have one, will not be using it to actively suck. Like anything, it becomes a habit. Anderson Pediatric Dentistry doesn’t want to make your parenting decisions. We want to help provide you with the information and tools you need to succeed.

 

If you are a current patient and your child is battling the binky or has recently given up his or her paci, we want to know! We want to celebrate this accomplishment with them because it’s definitely Something to Smile About!

Sports drinks, such as Gatorade and Powerade are made for replenishing lost electrolytes, glucose and sodium after strenuous activity. They are refreshing, taste good and seem like a good choice for active, hot kids and adults, alike. These drinks are sold everywhere and consumed by the masses, many times, not even during athletic activity.

 

The problem is that these drinks were originally designed for carbohydrate replacement for athletes and for use in strenuous activity, which most people are not doing on a regular basis. In fact, these drinks are often consumed by people in a sedentary setting. They are loaded in sugar- lots of sugar. A 12 ounce serving can have 21 grams of sugar, and most people drink more than 12 ounces! Considering that the American Heart Association recommends that adult women get no more than 25grams of added sugar and adult men get no more than 36 grams, that’s almost a full days worth of the recommended amount of added sugar for women, and more than half the recommended amount for men, all in one serving of a sports drink! And we all know that most people will drink the full bottle, not just one serving.

 

Very few adults, much less kids, are participating in any activity that requires replenishing the body’s sodium and glucose. In most situations, water is the best choice. With no calories and no sugar, it allows the body to use exercise to burn energy, rather than replace a little bit of caloric loss with huge amounts of sugar and empty calories.

 

There are times when these sports drinks are appropriate, and possibly beneficial. A report from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that those engaging in less than 60-90 minutes of exercise are better off sticking to water. For those taking part in prolonged, vigorous physical activities for more than one hour, and especially in hot temperatures when electrolyte imbalance and dehydration are a concern, a sports drink may be better than water. (https://www.issuelab.org/resources/18583/18583)

 

The use of sports drinks, as well as other sugary energy drinks, when not engaged in strenuous activity, can have negative effects. Aside from the sugar contributing to tooth decay, the additional calories may also contribute to weight gain when the calories consumed in these high-sugar drinks are not being expended during the physical activity.

 

When in doubt, choose water. It’s better for your teeth and better for your body! Stick to drinking sports drinks only during strenuous, prolonged activity, and be aware of the total sugar in your diet.