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Posts for tag: oral health

According to Delta Dental’s Original Tooth Fairy Poll, the going rate for your child’s lost tooth has declined in the past year. Based on their latest yearly survey, the average dollar amount that children received for a tooth is $3.70, down from $4.13 in 2018. (Remember when you thought a $1.00 per tooth was awesome?!?) Interestingly enough, it appears that the tooth fairy’s value on teeth coincides with the general movement of the economy. In 14 of the past 17 years, the tooth fairy’s prices have tracked with the movement of Standard and Poor’s 500 Index (S&P 500). It appears our famed Tooth Fairy may actually be a wise investor!

Economics aside, the Delta Dental poll also served to get valuable feedback on the Tooth Fairy and the role she plays in your child’s oral health. Of course, most kids only think of the Tooth Fairy as a chance to get some quick cash for a tooth they no longer need. But, it turns out that she may have some substantial influence on your child’s oral health habits. According to the answers given by parents in the survey, the Tooth Fairy is providing much more than a little spending money. Responses in the poll credited the Tooth Fairy with influencing these areas:

·        Joy: The Tooth Fairy gives kids something to be excited about, according to more than half of parents (56 percent).
 

·        Bedtime: Children go to bed early when leaving out a tooth say 30 percent of parents.
 

·        Savers: Children choose to save their Tooth Fairy earnings say nearly half of parents (48 percent).
 

·        Oral health: More than one-third of parents (34 percent) believe the Tooth Fairy instills good oral health habits.

 

While the Original Tooth Fairy Poll is meant for fun. It serves as a reminder that oral healthcare isn’t always boring or hard. Fun traditions, such as the Tooth Fairy, can incentivize kids to take better care of their teeth. Ownership and personal responsibility can be taught, as children realize that the Tooth Fairy prefers the healthy teeth over those with cavities. Even financial responsibility can be built into the equation by teaching children to save their money, or spend it wisely.

For more information and fun facts on the Original Tooth Fairy Poll, check out the website and take the poll at http://originaltoothfairypoll.com/.

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants your child to be at the top of the Tooth Fairy’s list! If you are looking for a dental home for your child in Anderson, South Carolina and surrounding areas, give us a call at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

 

Summer break is nearly here. You can feel the excitement in the air. No school, sleeping in, summer camps, spending time outside, swimming, time with friends. The beginning of summer is ripe with possibilities and Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to make sure you have the best summer.

Of course, the best summer shouldn’t end with a trip to your pediatric dentist to get a bunch of fillings! Often times, the lack of routine and the drastic change in daily diets can have a negative effect on your child’s teeth. It’s easy to see how. A few mornings sleeping in and “forgetting” to brush teeth, combined with a few more sodas or sugary drinks throughout the hot days, ice pops constantly dripping on your child’s teeth, vacation car trips with sugary snacks- these are all easily imagined situations. And don’t forget the dental emergencies that may arise when the game of flag football turns into a tackle game or your daughter decides to perfect her triple front twist off the diving board!

But summer dental care doesn’t have to be stressful. Follow our Summer Dental Tips below to keep your child’s smile shining bright all summer long!

 

Maybe you’ve heard of dental sealants before, but aren’t quite sure what they are or what they do. For many, sealants can be the hero of their oral health story, offering added protection from dental caries and helping ensure your child has better oral health. 

Dental sealants are made of a thin plastic material that is placed on the occlusal surface, or chewing surface of your child’s permanent molars and premolars. This plastic coating acts as a protective barrier from the bacteria and acids that contribute to tooth decay.

While the process of applying sealants and quick and painless, the results are real and long-lasting. Sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars. According to the CDC, “school-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants.”

Sealants can’t and won’t take the place of thorough brushing and flossing, which helps remove food particles and plaque from the smooth surfaces of teeth, but they can add extra protection for the grooved and pitted areas, where food and plaque often get stuck. The earlier your child receives sealants, the more beneficial they will be. By protecting the grooves, fissures and hard to reach areas of their back teeth, you can prevent dental decay from ever starting.

To learn more about sealants, how they are applied and how they may benefit your child, we recommend visiting the American Academy Dental Association’s website.

While we can’t reverse dental decay, sealants are a great way to prevent it. If you have questions about sealants, would like to schedule an appointment for your child, or are looking for a pediatric dentist for your child in the Anderson, SC area, call our office today at 864-760-1440. Let us give you and your child Something to Smile About!

 

It’s a common conversation in a pediatric dentist’s office.  “I don’t know what to do. My whole family has bad teeth.” Or, “I just don’t understand, we brush twice a day, everyday and she doesn’t drink soda. How can she have cavities?”

So, if the children that are receiving proper dental care are getting cavities, as well as the ones that aren’t brushing and flossing, we have to ask: Is there a such thing as bad teeth? Soft enamel?

Can your child’s, and your very own, dental problems be blamed on genetics, rather than poor dental hygiene? And if so, is this the ultimate excuse or are there ways to avoid these so-called, “bad teeth?”

In recent years, medical progress is being made on so many levels. Genetics are being studied on all levels to see just what role our genes play in our overall health and what we can do to overcome any genetic shortcomings. Because our dental health is so closely tied to our overall health and well-being (remember how dental disease and inflammation is linked to heart disease?), it makes complete sense that scientists are also studying the link between genetics and dental health.

So, is dental health genetic? The answer is yes. . . and no. Sometimes? It’s complicated. While scientists are finding genetic factors that affect some aspects of oral health, they are also confirming many environmental factors that play key roles in dental health- factors we can control.

Tooth decay, Bacteria and Sugar
Sugar in the food we eat feeds communities of hundreds of different types of bacteria that live on our teeth. The acid produced by these bacteria erodes the hard, outer layer of our teeth (the enamel) to cause cavities (tooth decay).

These bacteria in our mouth, the ones that cause tooth decay, aren’t present at birth. We normally acquire them shortly after birth, probably from other family members- think kisses on the mouth, pacifiers, teething items. Recent studies have been able to pinpoint which groups of bacteria are responsible for damaging our teeth. And it turns out that it’s not the genetic (inheritable) bacteria that are causing the tooth decay.

Want to take a stab at what types of bacteria can form cavities? You guessed it! The ones influenced by environmental factors like sugary foods! In fact, sugary drinks may be the very worst for your teeth! They are particularly adept at spreading sugar to every corner of your mouth, feeding the bacteria that cause decay. The good news is that the same types of bacteria in sugary foods that can form cavities, can also be brushed off your teeth!

But the story isn’t that simple.
While tooth decay is largely preventable, some people are more at risk of it than others. And genetics do play a role. Genes can affect how teeth develop and if teeth do not form properly, their enamel can actually be less resistant to bacteria. Genes can also affect whether your teeth will come in crooked or straight. Teeth that are crooked and overcrowded provide more areas for bacteria to hide and grow in, as they are more difficult to completely clean. Brushing and flossing become even more important in these situations, as a constant presence of these bacteria can cause cavities to form.

Tooth Color
The color of your teeth is another area that is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. The way in which the white enamel (and the underlying yellow dentine) forms during development is mainly due to our genes. Those whose teeth develop naturally with thinner enamel will have teeth that appear more yellow. Environmental factors that affect the teeth can be broken up into intrinsic factors (those that affect the teeth as they are developing) and extrinsic (those affecting the tooth after it develops). Intrinsic factors could include exposure to antibiotic tetracycline in the womb or excess fluoride as a child. Extrinsic factors affecting tooth color would be drinking coffee or tea and smoking.

So, tooth color, like tooth health, can be affected by both genetics and environmental. And while we can’t control the genetic factors, we can make changes to the environmental factors.

The message is still the same. Your teeth may be inherited, but bad oral health habits do not have to be. Everyone needs to take care of their teeth. Some people may have to work a little harder than others. But we can all take simple steps to ensure proper oral health. Avoid sugary foods and drinks, brush your teeth and have regular check-ups.

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry can help you take care of your child’s smile. Give us a call today at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

https://theconversation.com/bad-teeth-heres-when-you-can-and-cant-blame-your-parents-83887

https://www.cnn.com/2014/07/03/health/tooth-decay-causes/index.html

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/gum-disease/ada-04-genes-may-be-linked-to-tooth-decay-gum-disease

 

In a world where everything is getting, smaller, quicker and more efficient, it makes sense that pediatric
dentistry is following. Anderson Pediatric Dentistry is proud to offer laser dentistry in our office with our state-of-the-art WaterLase Laser.

While most of our procedures are still done the traditional way, laser dentistry can offer our patients an alternative treatment plan.

WaterLase dentistry uses laser energy and a gentle spray of water, allowing us to perform a wide range of dental procedures without the heat, vibration and pressure of a dental drill. For many procedures we are able to use less anesthetic, meaning less shots for your child. Using the WaterLase laser for dental procedures is usually, faster and more comfortable for the child, so we may be able to do more extensive treatments in less appointments. The laser can also be more precise, allowing us to save more healthy parts of the tooth and gums.

 

So, what do we use the WaterLase laser for and when is it an option?

 

The WaterLase laser at Anderson Pediatric Dentistry can be used for many treatments, ranging from cavities to periodontal disease. It can treat areas on the gums, as well as the teeth.

 

But, perhaps its most exciting and beneficial use for our clients, is for tongue and lip-tie treatment. The WaterLase laser offers us a quick and precise treatment option to help infants and young children who are suffering from negative impacts due to a tight frenulum causing tongue and/or lip-tie.

 

If your infant or young child is suffering from tongue and or lip-tie, their pediatrician may recommend a procedure called a frenectomy, in which the tight connective tissue that is causing the problems, is cut. A frenectomy done using our WaterLase Laser, uses cool water to make the incision, causing virtually no bleeding or pain, no risk of infection and almost instantaneous healing for infants. It’s also quicker, which is always a benefit with babies and young children.

 

If your child has tongue-tie, lip-tie or both, a frenectomy may be the correct treatment plan to enable them to nurse and/or eat better, thus allowing them to thrive and grow.  Give us a call today at 864-760-1440 so that we can schedule an appointment to discuss if our Waterlase laser is right for you. Let us ease the discomfort and help your child have Something to Smile About!