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Posts for tag: kids teeth

When our children are infants, their baby teeth are a BIG deal. We spend hours consoling them as they drool and gnaw on their hands during the teething process. We mark the date of their first tooth’s arrival in their baby books. We get just as excited as they do the first time they get to put their tooth under their pillow and eagerly await the tooth fairy.

So, why then, do many people feel like baby teeth aren’t as important as permanent teeth? The answer is right in that one word- permanent. Because we know that our “big” teeth are meant to last for life, we somehow get the idea that our children’s baby teeth, that we know they will lose at some point, must not be that important. After all, they get replaced, right?

Wrong! Baby teeth, despite their small stature and their shorter life span, serve many important roles in your child’s long-term oral health and development.

Promote good nutrition through proper chewing
Just as adult, or permanent, teeth do, the baby teeth serve the important role of biting, gnashing and chewing our food so that our bodies can readily digest the nutrients. Missing or painful baby teeth can make the child hesitant to eat certain foods which can cause them to lose out on much-needed nutrients.

Serve as space holders for the permanent teeth and provide a path for permanent teeth to follow when they are ready to erupt
Baby teeth are essentially a road map for the permanent teeth to follow, and when removed prematurely, before the permanent tooth is ready to erupt, it can cause long-term problems, even changing the structure of the child’s jaw bone and face. The permanent teeth may come in improperly, or possibly not at all, and your child could require orthodontic treatment to correct the problem.

Build self-esteem by providing a beautiful smile
Children naturally love to smile and find joy in the world. Beautiful baby teeth help them to do so. Even a young child can begin to feel self-conscious of missing or decayed teeth.

Enable the child to pay attention and learn in school without the distraction of dental pain.
It’s simple. Healthy teeth don’t hurt. In fact, kids don’t even think about their teeth when they are healthy. However, decayed teeth can cause a lot of pain! This pain can prevent them from getting adequate sleep, interrupt their day, and be distractive, preventing your child from excelling at school.

So, while it’s tempting to skip brushing your young child’s teeth when life gets busy, remember these small teeth play a BIG role in your child’s oral health and development. And remember, the care and importance that you give to their baby teeth will influence how they take care of their teeth on their own.

Taking care of your young child’s teeth can be simple. Follow these rules and help your child’s smile shine bright.

1)     Start brushing as soon as your child gets his or her first tooth. Brush twice a day, even if it’s just for a short amount of time.

2)     Floss any teeth that touch.

3)     Limit sugary drinks, even juice.

4)     Don’t go to bed with any drinks other than water.

5)     Model good oral health by taking care of your own teeth! Kids learn by watching their parents.

6)     Schedule an appointment with a pediatric dentist within six months of the arrival of their first tooth, or by their one-year old     birthday. Early prevention and monitoring, as well as education about good oral health, will help prevent problems.

 

As always, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to be your go-to resource for helping to educate parents and children alike, and giving all children the beautiful smiles that they deserve. If you are looking for a dental home for your child, give us a call at 864-760-1440, and let us give you Something to Smile About!

October 15, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: cavities   kids teeth   Candy   sugar   weight   crafts   Halloween   Calories   Recycle   Treats   Experiments   Smiles  

Halloween can be so much fun! It’s an event that seems to start at the beginning of the month and just keeps going. Between picking out costumes, carving pumpkins, attending trunk or treat and other Halloween events, Halloween night is often just one of many celebrations. And while it’s fun for kids and parents alike to get dressed up and have fun, the constant influx of candy and sugar can leave us with some not so wanted “treats.”

Calories. As much as we wish they didn’t count, the truth is, they do. The average child will consume 3,500-7,000 calories on Halloween! You read it right. 7,000 calories is the same at 13 Big Macs!

Now, take this amount and think about how many calories your child will consume if you allow the candy binge to go on for days or weeks! It’s not just their teeth that will be affected. This onslaught of sugar and calories will affect your child’s blood sugar, behavior, weight and overall feelings of well-being. That is definitely not a fun trick or treat!

Candy. It’s all about the candy! We know. We get it. We remember being little and competing to see who could fill up a pillowcase of candy. But, let’s be honest. Who needs a pillowcase of candy? Most of the time, half the candy collected is candy your child doesn’t even like. So, why hang on to it and tempt them to eat it? Besides, there are so many better things to do with your candy than eat it!

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to share some insights and tips for how your family can make Halloween more about the fun and less about the candy.

 

Our suggestions:
 

-        Make trick-or-treating about the actual event and the fun of the night, not about the candy.

-        Immediately sort the candy and pull out sticky, sour or gummy treats. Chocolate candies melt off the teeth easier and won’t cling to the teeth as long. Go ahead and get rid of all the stuff your child doesn’t like so they aren’t tempted to eat it just because it’s there!

-        Allow your child to enjoy their candy for a day or two, and then trash it, or consider donating it or participating in a candy buy-back so that your child can trade their sugar for cash!

-        Recycle. If the thought of throwing away bags of candy leaves you feeling wasteful, consider ways to recycle the candy and use it for fun activities other than eating.

Check out Pinterest and other sites for great candy crafts and science experiments. With names like “the incredible growing gummy worm” and the “density rainbow,” kids will engage their minds and learn, all while using up their candy.

-        Focus on the fun, not the candy. Make the emphasis on dressing up, painting faces, carving pumpkins and other pre-Halloween events so that candy is just a small part of the whole evening. 

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wishes everyone a fun and safe Halloween, full of fun, good times and lots of healthy smiles! 

 

A pediatric dentist advising you to give your child dark chocolate instead of the ever-popular fish-shaped crackers? It sounds crazy, right? Well, this post is the "Eat this, not that" for your teeth. And I will explain why. Just keep reading.

More and more, we are seeing the connection between diet and nutrition and overall health. As one might guess, this applies to your oral health, too. In fact, simple changes in your child’s diet may be the answer to keeping cavities away.

Cavities are caused when cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth feeds off simple sugars and causes acid plaque. This plaque attacks the enamel of the tooth and causes it to soften and eventually creates holes, or cavities in the tooth.

So, we know that sugar sitting on your teeth is not a good thing. It would make sense to choose foods that we feel are low in sugar. And this does help. But, it turns out, there’s more to it. In fact, it’s not just the amount of sugar that matters when we are trying to avoid cavities. There are actually three factors that impact the way food affects your teeth:

1)     Stickiness

2)     Sugar concentration

3)     Frequency

 

Stickiness- Not all foods are created equal. Flour seems to be the culprit behind a food’s stickiness. Think about it this way, when you eat an apple or baby carrots, there’s no food clinging to your teeth. When you eat crackers or pretzels, you will have food debris sticking to your teeth. Any food or sugar remaining on the teeth becomes a breeding ground for cavity-causing bacteria.


Sugar concentration- It makes sense that food lower in sugars are better for your teeth (and your body). But, contrary to popular belief, the amount of sugar is not the full story. In fact, it appears that when it comes to dental caries (cavities), it is the sugar concentration more than the actual amount, that actually matters.

This concept is pretty mind-blowing and also pretty important to understand! Basically, when choosing between foods that have the same amount of simple sugars, you can make a better choice for your teeth by choosing the one that also contains fat- or more fat. Why? Dr. Roger Lucas, DDS, explains it well when he says, “When you take away fat, you are indirectly increasing the concentration of sugar.”

Why does the concentration matter? A 2014 in vitro study* that found that whole milk is not acidic enough to demineralize enamel, but skim milk can demineralize enamel. This study confirmed that it is the concentration of sugars in the foods we choose, more than the amount of sugar, that contributes to dental caries.

By taking the fat out of a food, you are raising the sugar concentration. Fat doesn’t cause cavities. Sugars and starches do. So, you want to pick the food that has the lower sugar concentration, not necessarily the lowest sugar content.

What’s an example of choosing a better snack option? Swap snacks like Goldfish crackers for dark chocolate (at least 70%). This sounds crazy, but when you look at the two snacks, you see that while they have similar sugar content, dark chocolate has a higher fat content, and thus a lower sugar concentration. It also sticks to the teeth less, offers antioxidants, and parents are far less likely to allow their child to walk around eating dark chocolate bars all day long, like we often do with crackers and other easily portable snacks.
 

Frequency- Each time you eat or drink, the teeth are attacked for about 20 minutes, until the saliva has time to neutralize the acids and wash the bacteria away. Limiting the times this happens throughout the day can decrease the damage done to the teeth. This is especially true when children are snacking on crackers, sticky fruit chews and other common snack foods constantly throughout the day.

Other great options are nuts, cheese, crunchy vegetables and fruits, meats and yogurt. While most fruits anad vegetables have virtually no fat content, they also don't stick to your child's teeth and can be easily washed awayw ith water after eating. Remember, it's a combination fo the stickiness, the sugar content and the frequency of eating that cause cavities.

The truth of it is, diet and nutrition should be your first line of defense for healthy teeth. Brushing, flossing and fluoride should be the second.

Your oral health is not something that has to be left to chance. Good nutrition and good oral healthcare, along with regular checkups with your pediatric dentist, can keep the cavities away! Come let Anderson Pediatric Dentistry give you and your child Something to Smile About!
 

*(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24717697)

 

 

School is just weeks away. Soon, we will be looking at school supply lists, organizing backpacks and getting back in our early morning routines. We’ll also be packing lunches and planning quick breakfasts to help get everyone out the door. We’ll be quick to ensure our kids get plenty of sleep and do their homework, but there’s another factor that may have just as much of an impact on your child’s education and daily success- nutrition.

Most people understand the link between good nutrition and their child’s growth and development. But, studies are showing us that good nutrition has far reaching effects, beyond just helping your child grow bigger and stronger. A child’s diet can directly impact their education. With better nutrition, students are better able to learn, miss fewer days of school and have less behavior issues, all of which can directly affect their self-esteem and confidence.

While we know that too much sugar can cause behavior problems in most children, studies are also showing that deficiencies in key nutrients can also have negative impacts on a child’s ability to process and learn new information. For example, iron deficiency has been shown to negatively impact cognition. Deficiencies in other vitamins, amino acids and minerals are shown to impair concentration and cognitive abilities.

It goes without saying that good nutrition can also directly impact your child’s oral health. Teeth need a healthy diet to remain strong and cavity free. Children with poor oral health and cavities tend to miss more school days, which can impact both their grades and their social development.

The results of poor nutrition can create a ripple effect in a child’s life, as any child experiencing poor educational outcomes or constantly getting in trouble for behavior issues will soon feel the stigma of being labeled as a trouble maker or a child that isn’t trying. In the same way, a child who has poor oral health due to a sugary diet or nutritional deficits, may become insecure in social settings, feel uncomfortable smiling and lose confidence.

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants every child to thrive. We know that a good education is the building block to success and that every child deserves the ability to be successful. We support the efforts of organizations in our community that are dedicated to making sure children are fed, such as United Way’s snack pack program, and also encourage parents and caregivers to ensure that their child is receiving adequate nutrition to help them reach their full potential.

Every child deserves Something to Smile About!

 

For more information on the power of good nutrition, this article below is a great start.

http://articles.extension.org/pages/68774/3-ways-nutrition-influences-student-learning-potential-and-school-performance

July 09, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: kids teeth   Tips   Toddlers   prepare   dental appointments   anxiety   blog   crafts   fear   stress   experience   happy   teeth   cleaning   kids   parents  

 

So you looked at your calendar and realized that your child’s next dental appointment is coming up. Now, you are trying to mentally prepare both yourself and your child. How can you help ease your child’s anxiety and make this visit fun? There are lots of ways parents can help prepare their child for a dental visit, and believe it or not, parents can actually have the most influence on how their child will feel about their trip to the dentist.

 

What can you do to help make your child’s visit a great experience? We have some tips for you below.

 

~ Talk to your child. Explain to your child what a dentist is and why it’s important to take care of his/her teeth. Let them know what they can expect, such as the dentist looking in their mouth, brushing and flossing and even taking x-rays. Make sure that they know that the dentist is there to help them keep a beautiful smile.

 

~ Avoid negative words and talk. You may have had a painful toothache or have had extensive work done on your teeth, but try not to talk to your child about negative dental experiences.

 

~ Prepare with fun dental accessories like character toothbrushes or toothpaste. Kids love seeing their favorite characters, like princesses or cars, on their toothbrushes or toothpaste. If using a Trolls toothbrush makes brushing easier, by all means, use a Trolls toothbrush! Just make sure to choose items that have the ADA seal of approval on them to ensure safe and effective ingredients.

 

~ Read about the dentist. There are many great children books about visiting the dentist. Seeing their favorite characters successfully visit the dentist can help alleviate a child’s fears about their visit.

 

~ Watch a show. Again, there are great cartoons that focus on visits to the dentist. We have seen Barenstein Bears, Doc McStuffins, Mister Rogers, Bubble Guppies and several other popular cartoons that focus on visiting the dentist.

 

~ Encourage. Positive reinforcement goes a long way. Always tell your child how proud you are of them and what a big, brave boy/girl they are. New experiences can be scary and anytime they handle it well, we want to offer praise and encouragement.

 

~ Crafts. Pinterest and the internet are loaded with great dental-themed crafts. Many of these are also educational and can be used to help teach your child about dental health, brushing, flossing, etc. They are great boredom busters, but also, a great way to make dental visits seems less intimidating and more fun. Have your child make a dental craft and bring it in to the office to show the team!

 

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants both parents and their children to always feel safe and secure, respected and well cared for. If you have an upcoming visit and your child is experiencing anxiety, we are here to help ease the fear. Our goal is to help children have fun at the dentist. After all, we think we are kind of fun to be around! If you have questions or concerns about an upcoming visit, or would like to schedule your child’s first or next visit, call us at 864-760-1440. Let us give you and your child Something to Smile About!