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Posts for tag: habits

With the YMCA youth soccer season kicking off this week, we know that life is about get even more hectic for many of our families. Between school, sports, after-school activities and all the fun fall activities that are soon to get underway, who has time to cook, much less eat together?

Not so fast! Before you ditch the family dinners for the rest of the fall- or year- Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to remind you that sitting down to eat with your family is about more than just food. In fact, study after study have linked eating family meals as one of the most important things you can do for your child! Life is busy. We get it. But sitting down to eat as a family can have a tremendous impact on everyone.

According to Anne Fishel, co-founder of The Family Dinner Project, a professor at Harvard Medical School and the author of "Home for Dinner", family dinners are one of the best things you can do as a parent! Years of research are now claiming that these benefits can come from regular family dinners!

·       Dinnertime conversation boosts vocabulary even more than being read aloud to. Children with large vocabularies learn to   read earlier.
 

·       Adolescents who ate family meals five to seven times a week were twice as likely to get A’s in school as those who ate dinner with their families fewer than two times a week.
 

·        Several of the studies link regular family dinners with lowering a host of high risk teenage behaviors parents fear: smoking, binge drinking, marijuana use, violence, school problems, eating disorders and sexual activity.
 

·       In a very recent study, kids who had recently been victims of cyberbullying bounced back more readily if they had regular family dinners.
 

·       In a New Zealand study, regular family meals was strongly associated with positive moods in adolescents. And we ask, who doesn’t need teenagers with more positive moods?!?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/01/12/the-most-important-thing-you-can-do-with-your-kids-eat-dinner-with-them/

Don’t just take the word of your Anderson pediatric dentist. Take the advice of family therapists, researchers and stacks of studies. Eating regular family dinners is important. Whether it’s hotdogs, lasagna or sandwiches, it’s not about the quality of the food. It’s about the quality of the time spent together with your family. Don’t let life’s chaos ruin your family dinners. This week Anderson Pediatric Dentistry will be providing easy meal ideas and recipes to help you get back to your family dinners!

As always, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry strives to be more than just your kid’s dentist, or more than just the best pediatric dentist that offers cleanings, sealants, fluoride and x-rays. We want to be your go-to resource for your child’s dental health, as well as their overall health and well-being. We believe it takes a village to raise great kids and we want all our patients to succeed in all aspects of life. 

If you have dental concerns or are looking for dental home for your child, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry would love to welcome you into our family. Call us today at 864-760-1440, or visit the website to learn more at www.andersonpediatricdentistry.com. Let us give you and your child Something to Smile About!

 

According to Delta Dental’s Original Tooth Fairy Poll, the going rate for your child’s lost tooth has declined in the past year. Based on their latest yearly survey, the average dollar amount that children received for a tooth is $3.70, down from $4.13 in 2018. (Remember when you thought a $1.00 per tooth was awesome?!?) Interestingly enough, it appears that the tooth fairy’s value on teeth coincides with the general movement of the economy. In 14 of the past 17 years, the tooth fairy’s prices have tracked with the movement of Standard and Poor’s 500 Index (S&P 500). It appears our famed Tooth Fairy may actually be a wise investor!

Economics aside, the Delta Dental poll also served to get valuable feedback on the Tooth Fairy and the role she plays in your child’s oral health. Of course, most kids only think of the Tooth Fairy as a chance to get some quick cash for a tooth they no longer need. But, it turns out that she may have some substantial influence on your child’s oral health habits. According to the answers given by parents in the survey, the Tooth Fairy is providing much more than a little spending money. Responses in the poll credited the Tooth Fairy with influencing these areas:

·        Joy: The Tooth Fairy gives kids something to be excited about, according to more than half of parents (56 percent).
 

·        Bedtime: Children go to bed early when leaving out a tooth say 30 percent of parents.
 

·        Savers: Children choose to save their Tooth Fairy earnings say nearly half of parents (48 percent).
 

·        Oral health: More than one-third of parents (34 percent) believe the Tooth Fairy instills good oral health habits.

 

While the Original Tooth Fairy Poll is meant for fun. It serves as a reminder that oral healthcare isn’t always boring or hard. Fun traditions, such as the Tooth Fairy, can incentivize kids to take better care of their teeth. Ownership and personal responsibility can be taught, as children realize that the Tooth Fairy prefers the healthy teeth over those with cavities. Even financial responsibility can be built into the equation by teaching children to save their money, or spend it wisely.

For more information and fun facts on the Original Tooth Fairy Poll, check out the website and take the poll at http://originaltoothfairypoll.com/.

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants your child to be at the top of the Tooth Fairy’s list! If you are looking for a dental home for your child in Anderson, South Carolina and surrounding areas, give us a call at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

 

It’s a common conversation in a pediatric dentist’s office.  “I don’t know what to do. My whole family has bad teeth.” Or, “I just don’t understand, we brush twice a day, everyday and she doesn’t drink soda. How can she have cavities?”

So, if the children that are receiving proper dental care are getting cavities, as well as the ones that aren’t brushing and flossing, we have to ask: Is there a such thing as bad teeth? Soft enamel?

Can your child’s, and your very own, dental problems be blamed on genetics, rather than poor dental hygiene? And if so, is this the ultimate excuse or are there ways to avoid these so-called, “bad teeth?”

In recent years, medical progress is being made on so many levels. Genetics are being studied on all levels to see just what role our genes play in our overall health and what we can do to overcome any genetic shortcomings. Because our dental health is so closely tied to our overall health and well-being (remember how dental disease and inflammation is linked to heart disease?), it makes complete sense that scientists are also studying the link between genetics and dental health.

So, is dental health genetic? The answer is yes. . . and no. Sometimes? It’s complicated. While scientists are finding genetic factors that affect some aspects of oral health, they are also confirming many environmental factors that play key roles in dental health- factors we can control.

Tooth decay, Bacteria and Sugar
Sugar in the food we eat feeds communities of hundreds of different types of bacteria that live on our teeth. The acid produced by these bacteria erodes the hard, outer layer of our teeth (the enamel) to cause cavities (tooth decay).

These bacteria in our mouth, the ones that cause tooth decay, aren’t present at birth. We normally acquire them shortly after birth, probably from other family members- think kisses on the mouth, pacifiers, teething items. Recent studies have been able to pinpoint which groups of bacteria are responsible for damaging our teeth. And it turns out that it’s not the genetic (inheritable) bacteria that are causing the tooth decay.

Want to take a stab at what types of bacteria can form cavities? You guessed it! The ones influenced by environmental factors like sugary foods! In fact, sugary drinks may be the very worst for your teeth! They are particularly adept at spreading sugar to every corner of your mouth, feeding the bacteria that cause decay. The good news is that the same types of bacteria in sugary foods that can form cavities, can also be brushed off your teeth!

But the story isn’t that simple.
While tooth decay is largely preventable, some people are more at risk of it than others. And genetics do play a role. Genes can affect how teeth develop and if teeth do not form properly, their enamel can actually be less resistant to bacteria. Genes can also affect whether your teeth will come in crooked or straight. Teeth that are crooked and overcrowded provide more areas for bacteria to hide and grow in, as they are more difficult to completely clean. Brushing and flossing become even more important in these situations, as a constant presence of these bacteria can cause cavities to form.

Tooth Color
The color of your teeth is another area that is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. The way in which the white enamel (and the underlying yellow dentine) forms during development is mainly due to our genes. Those whose teeth develop naturally with thinner enamel will have teeth that appear more yellow. Environmental factors that affect the teeth can be broken up into intrinsic factors (those that affect the teeth as they are developing) and extrinsic (those affecting the tooth after it develops). Intrinsic factors could include exposure to antibiotic tetracycline in the womb or excess fluoride as a child. Extrinsic factors affecting tooth color would be drinking coffee or tea and smoking.

So, tooth color, like tooth health, can be affected by both genetics and environmental. And while we can’t control the genetic factors, we can make changes to the environmental factors.

The message is still the same. Your teeth may be inherited, but bad oral health habits do not have to be. Everyone needs to take care of their teeth. Some people may have to work a little harder than others. But we can all take simple steps to ensure proper oral health. Avoid sugary foods and drinks, brush your teeth and have regular check-ups.

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry can help you take care of your child’s smile. Give us a call today at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

https://theconversation.com/bad-teeth-heres-when-you-can-and-cant-blame-your-parents-83887

https://www.cnn.com/2014/07/03/health/tooth-decay-causes/index.html

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/gum-disease/ada-04-genes-may-be-linked-to-tooth-decay-gum-disease