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Posts for tag: cavities

April 22, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sealants   cavities   brushing   Toddlers   teeth   infant  


Photo by Kevin Fai from Pexels

 

As a parent, you have the power to give your child a beautiful smile! Toddlers and young children are not physically able to brush their teeth correctly. It’s important for parents to always help brush small children’s teeth, and to continue supervising and assisting with brushing until the age of seven to eight years old. Even once the child becomes older, it’s a good idea to check in on their brushing and flossing habits regularly!

 

Taking great care of your young child’s teeth is simple if you follow a few guidelines:

Consistency is Key. Brush your child’s teeth twice a day, every single day. As soon as the teeth begin to touch, start flossing several times a week.

Use a child’s size toothbrush. A smaller toothbrush size ensures a better fit and more comfortable experience.

Use the right toothpaste. Toddlers and young children should use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste and be able to spit the toothpaste out, not swallow it. Infants should use a fluoride-free toothpaste until they are two years-old, or capable of spitting the toothpaste out.

Brush effectively. Use small, circular brushes to sweep the food and bacteria off the teeth. When brushing the gumline, angle your brush at 45 degrees to get alone the gumline.

Brush your entire mouth. Brush each and every tooth, your gums, tongue and roof of mouth.

Aim for two-minutes, twice a day. It may seem like a long time, but it takes at least this long to brush every surface of every tooth.

Make it fun. Youtube is full of fun brushing songs, you can find brushing apps on your phone, or make up you own silly songs to keep it fun.

Model good oral hygiene! If your child sees that you value your smile and take great care of your teeth, he or she will learn to do the same.

 

Other ways to keep your child’s smile shining for life:

Limit juice, soda, sports drinks and other sugary liquids that cause sugar to sit on the teeth.

Eat a healthy diet full of fruits, vegetables and calcium-rich foods.

Avoid sticky, gummy and acidic candies and treats. Opt for chocolates that melt away quicker and don’t stick as long.

Floss regularly, at least several times a week. Daily is best!

Make your child wear a mouthguard when engaging in contact sports or any activity where a mouth injury could occur.

 

As always, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry strives to be a go-to resource for your pediatric dental questions. If you are in Anderson county or surrounding areas and need a dental home for your child, give our office a call at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

 

X-rays are a highly beneficial tool in the world of dentistry. An x-ray can help to diagnose tooth decay, gum disease and infections that may not be visible on the surface of the tooth. X-rays help monitor growth and development and allow the pediatric dentist to see potential problems before the tooth erupts. They also help screen for bone loss or pathology that may not be visible or currently be symptomatic. Without an x-ray, many of these problems could go undiagnosed. By using an x-ray as a reference, your dentist will be better equipped to prepare tooth implants, dentures, braces, and other similar treatments.  

 

However, like many things in life, there are drawbacks to dental x-rays, as well. Exposure to radiation can be harmful to humans, as it damages cells. Pediatric dentists and parents are, therefore, wise to know the truth about the radiation from x-rays and balance the benefits with any possible drawbacks.  

 

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry adheres to the ALARA principle. ALARA stands for "as low as reasonably achievable". This principle means that we strive to expose our patients to as little radiation as possible, using as few x-rays procedures as we can, while still providing the best patient care. We also follow th recommended practive guidelines to reduce exposure when performing x-rays. To do this, we use three basic protective measures in radiation safety: time, distance, and shielding. By usinf the following techniques, we are able to limit radiation exposure to our patients:  

 

·        Use of the fastest image receptor (the fastest film speed or digital speed) 

·        Reduction in the size of the x-ray beam to the size of the image receptor whenever possible 

·        Use of proper exposure and processing techniques 

·        Use of leaded aprons and, whenever possible, thyroid collars 

 

While x-rays do expose individuals to radiation, it’s important to remember that we are all exposed to certain levels of radiation in our everyday life. Eating a banana, living in a brick home and even watching television expose you relatively small levels of radiation each day. As pediatric dentists, we weigh the benefits of treating dental issues with the potential harm. A routine exam, which includes 4 bitewings is about 0.005 mSv. This amount is less than one day of natural background radiation and about the same amount of radiation exposure one would receive from a short airplane flight of 1-2 hours. (www.xrayrisk.com/faq.php). Using digital X-Rays, as we do at Anderson Pediatric Dentistry, significantly reduces this amount to be even less. 

 

There are ways for parents and dentists to help minimize the need for x-rays. Request a visual exam be done prior to consenting to x-rays. If you have current x-rays from a previous dentist, make sure to transfer these to your current dentist to eliminate the need for repeat x-rays. While dental x-rays are considered extremely safe, and often essential, it’s important to understand the procedures and any potential exposure to radiation so that you can be sure that the benefits outweigh the inherent risks.

 

If you have questions or concerns, never hesitate to discuss the need for x-rays with your pediatric dentist so that you can best care for and protect your child’s dental and overall health. 

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry strives to be your go-to resource for pediatric dental health. If you are looking for a dental home for your child, we welcome you to call our office today at 864-760-1440. Let us give you Something to Smile About! 

 

 

In a world where everything is getting, smaller, quicker and more efficient, it makes sense that pediatric
dentistry is following. Anderson Pediatric Dentistry is proud to offer laser dentistry in our office with our state-of-the-art WaterLase Laser.

While most of our procedures are still done the traditional way, laser dentistry can offer our patients an alternative treatment plan.

WaterLase dentistry uses laser energy and a gentle spray of water, allowing us to perform a wide range of dental procedures without the heat, vibration and pressure of a dental drill. For many procedures we are able to use less anesthetic, meaning less shots for your child. Using the WaterLase laser for dental procedures is usually, faster and more comfortable for the child, so we may be able to do more extensive treatments in less appointments. The laser can also be more precise, allowing us to save more healthy parts of the tooth and gums.

 

So, what do we use the WaterLase laser for and when is it an option?

 

The WaterLase laser at Anderson Pediatric Dentistry can be used for many treatments, ranging from cavities to periodontal disease. It can treat areas on the gums, as well as the teeth.

 

But, perhaps its most exciting and beneficial use for our clients, is for tongue and lip-tie treatment. The WaterLase laser offers us a quick and precise treatment option to help infants and young children who are suffering from negative impacts due to a tight frenulum causing tongue and/or lip-tie.

 

If your infant or young child is suffering from tongue and or lip-tie, their pediatrician may recommend a procedure called a frenectomy, in which the tight connective tissue that is causing the problems, is cut. A frenectomy done using our WaterLase Laser, uses cool water to make the incision, causing virtually no bleeding or pain, no risk of infection and almost instantaneous healing for infants. It’s also quicker, which is always a benefit with babies and young children.

 

If your child has tongue-tie, lip-tie or both, a frenectomy may be the correct treatment plan to enable them to nurse and/or eat better, thus allowing them to thrive and grow.  Give us a call today at 864-760-1440 so that we can schedule an appointment to discuss if our Waterlase laser is right for you. Let us ease the discomfort and help your child have Something to Smile About!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that what happens in your mouth effect other areas of our body and overall health? Its true. Your oral health and the condition of your teeth and gums can impact your entire health.

How is this possible? Great question. Just like studies are now proving that your gut bacteria affect your health, the mouth’s bacteria do too. Bacteria in your mouth? Oh, yeah- tons of them! Most of these bacteria are pretty harmless, as our body’s normal defenses, combined with good oral health care (daily brushing in flossing), keep them under control. However, if a person does not have good oral hygiene, the bacteria may be allowed to reach levels high enough to produce oral infections, tooth decay and gum disease.

How does tooth decay or gum disease impact your entire body? Studies suggest that oral bacteria, and the inflammation associated with periodontitis, might actually play a role in some diseases.

- Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart. It typically occurs with bacteria and other germs from another part of your body spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in the heart. You guessed it. Bacteria from your mouth can enter the bloodstream and go to your heart.

-Cardiovascular disease, such as heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke are now believed to be linked to inflammation and infections that can be caused by oral bacteria.

-Poor oral health leading to periodontitis during pregnancy has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.

The connection between oral health and your overall health goes both ways. Just as your oral health can cause problems for your overall health, health issues in your body can affect the health of your mouth.

Certain medications, such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics, antidepressants and some inhalers, can reduce saliva flow. Since saliva is your body’s natural defense and method for washing away food and bacteria and neutralizing acids in the mouth, this can impact the amounts of bacteria in the mouth.

Other studies have found that some diseases that lower the body’s resistance to infection, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can make oral health problems more severe, too.

The human body is an amazing thing. But it’s important to remember that we have to take care of all of its parts- even the mouth. It’s not enough to diet, exercise and meditate. You have to brush and floss, too. Remember, your teeth are more than just a pretty smile. They aid in speech, development, eating and nutrition, face shape and appearance and so much more. You can hide a belly or other area you may not love, but you can’t hide your teeth!

This year, make a resolution to get in better oral health! Commit to brushing twice a day and flossing daily. Your teeth will thank you and so will your whole body.

If you need help getting your child’s mouth in shape this year, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry would love to help. Call our office at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

Did you know that one in 12 Americans suffers from asthma? That number seems alarming and a little difficult to believe, but the prevalence of asthma is increasing every year. Ironically, asthma and childhood caries (cavities) are the two most prevalent childhood diseases.

Most people diagnosed with asthma will begin using an inhaler, either as a rescue option or preventative treatment, or both. If you or your child uses an inhaler, you may have heard suggestions that inhalers cause cavities or that children with asthma have more dental problems.

The truth is that asthma and inhalers will not cause cavities.  However, the two are often linked because, they may make your child’s mouth more susceptible to conditions that allow cavity-causing bacteria to thrive. The good news is that these concerns can be easily managed and your child will not have to choose between a beautiful smile or breathing freely.

1) Dry Mouth
Typically, those suffering from respiratory problems, such as asthma and allergies, suffer from restricted air flow, causing them to breathe through their mouth, rather than their nose. Mouth breathing has been linked with dry mouth and less saliva.


Saliva is key to washing away debris and fighting bacteria, so when your mouth is dry, it’s easier for plaque-causing bacteria to reproduce, increasing the chances of bad breath, tooth decay and gum disease. In addition, some medications in the inhalers can also have a drying effect on your mouth.
 

2) Mouth Sores
Regular use of the inhaler can sometimes lead to sores or ulcers on the back roof of the child’s mouth if the medications irritate the skin.

 

What You Can Do:
 

A little vigilance will go a long way. Follow these easy steps below to ensure that your child’s treatments aren’t damaging their teeth.

1) Rinse and Brush.
After using the inhaler, be sure that your child rinses his or her mouth with water. Brushing is even better.

 

2) Water, water, water.
Keep your child hydrated with water throughout the day to counteract the effects of a dry mouth.
 

3) Talk to your dentist.
Make sure to tell your child’s dentist about his or her asthma, medications and concerns. Your pediatric dentist can recommend strategies for maintain your child’s oral health.
 

4) Treat allergies.
Asthma and allergies often come together. Constantly having a stuffy nose will cause a child to breathe through their mouth, too, causing dry mouth. Proper treatment of allergies can alleviate the need to breathe through their mouth as often, enabling the child’s saliva to help fight off plaque-causing bacteria.

Remember, asthma isn’t a prescription, or excuse, for cavities. With a few simple preventative measures, your child can maintain his or her oral health and ensure a beautiful smile for life. If you have questions or concerns about your child’s teeth, or you are looking for a dental home for your child, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry would love to give you Something to Smile About! Call our office today at 864-760-1440.

 

https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/asthma/index.html

 

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/asthma.html