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Posts for tag: caries

Maybe you’ve heard of dental sealants before, but aren’t quite sure what they are or what they do. For many, sealants can be the hero of their oral health story, offering added protection from dental caries and helping ensure your child has better oral health. 

Dental sealants are made of a thin plastic material that is placed on the occlusal surface, or chewing surface of your child’s permanent molars and premolars. This plastic coating acts as a protective barrier from the bacteria and acids that contribute to tooth decay.

While the process of applying sealants and quick and painless, the results are real and long-lasting. Sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars. According to the CDC, “school-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants.”

Sealants can’t and won’t take the place of thorough brushing and flossing, which helps remove food particles and plaque from the smooth surfaces of teeth, but they can add extra protection for the grooved and pitted areas, where food and plaque often get stuck. The earlier your child receives sealants, the more beneficial they will be. By protecting the grooves, fissures and hard to reach areas of their back teeth, you can prevent dental decay from ever starting.

To learn more about sealants, how they are applied and how they may benefit your child, we recommend visiting the American Academy Dental Association’s website.

While we can’t reverse dental decay, sealants are a great way to prevent it. If you have questions about sealants, would like to schedule an appointment for your child, or are looking for a pediatric dentist for your child in the Anderson, SC area, call our office today at 864-760-1440. Let us give you and your child Something to Smile About!

 

 

Did you know that what happens in your mouth effect other areas of our body and overall health? Its true. Your oral health and the condition of your teeth and gums can impact your entire health.

How is this possible? Great question. Just like studies are now proving that your gut bacteria affect your health, the mouth’s bacteria do too. Bacteria in your mouth? Oh, yeah- tons of them! Most of these bacteria are pretty harmless, as our body’s normal defenses, combined with good oral health care (daily brushing in flossing), keep them under control. However, if a person does not have good oral hygiene, the bacteria may be allowed to reach levels high enough to produce oral infections, tooth decay and gum disease.

How does tooth decay or gum disease impact your entire body? Studies suggest that oral bacteria, and the inflammation associated with periodontitis, might actually play a role in some diseases.

- Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart. It typically occurs with bacteria and other germs from another part of your body spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in the heart. You guessed it. Bacteria from your mouth can enter the bloodstream and go to your heart.

-Cardiovascular disease, such as heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke are now believed to be linked to inflammation and infections that can be caused by oral bacteria.

-Poor oral health leading to periodontitis during pregnancy has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.

The connection between oral health and your overall health goes both ways. Just as your oral health can cause problems for your overall health, health issues in your body can affect the health of your mouth.

Certain medications, such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, diuretics, antidepressants and some inhalers, can reduce saliva flow. Since saliva is your body’s natural defense and method for washing away food and bacteria and neutralizing acids in the mouth, this can impact the amounts of bacteria in the mouth.

Other studies have found that some diseases that lower the body’s resistance to infection, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can make oral health problems more severe, too.

The human body is an amazing thing. But it’s important to remember that we have to take care of all of its parts- even the mouth. It’s not enough to diet, exercise and meditate. You have to brush and floss, too. Remember, your teeth are more than just a pretty smile. They aid in speech, development, eating and nutrition, face shape and appearance and so much more. You can hide a belly or other area you may not love, but you can’t hide your teeth!

This year, make a resolution to get in better oral health! Commit to brushing twice a day and flossing daily. Your teeth will thank you and so will your whole body.

If you need help getting your child’s mouth in shape this year, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry would love to help. Call our office at 864-760-1440 and let us give you Something to Smile About!

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

How does your child’s dental health affect their education? Can their dental hygiene have an impact on their grades? Their happiness? Absolutely.


We all know that how we feel can impact our day. It’s hard to have a great day when you are in pain. The same is true for children with poor oral health. Imagine sitting through a day of school, trying to learn and perform your best, while suffering through a toothache or infection. It would be nearly impossible.


Children with poor oral health tend to miss more school for dental pain caused by infections, have a harder time focusing, display more behavior problems and even suffer psychological problems such as anxiety and depression. The pain is not only physical. Children with poor oral health may be impaired socially as they become embarrassed of their teeth, smile less and engage with their peers less. The impacts of poor oral health in children can be far-reaching, impacting their lives all the way into adulthood.


This is important because childhood caries (cavities) is the most prevalent chronic disease in children and adolescents. Its affects more kids than asthma! The good news is that there are easy ways to help your child achieve better oral health and better overall health.


At Anderson Pediatric Dentistry, we believe that every child deserves a smile they can be proud of. Following the American Association of Pediatric Dentistry’s guidelines for oral healthcare is the simplest way to achieve this.


  • Monitor Kids Brushing: Parents and caregivers should help or watch over their kids’ tooth brushing abilities until they’re at least 8-years-old.

  • The Right Toothbrush: Kids should use a soft toothbrush that allows them to reach all areas of their mouth. Replace toothbrushes every three-four months and even sooner if the bristles are worn out, or if your children have been sick.

  • Brush Twice a Day: Plaque is a sticky film of germs that forms on teeth and gums after eating. Plaque that’s not removed daily can lead to cavities.

  • Visit a Dentist: It’s important to visit your dentist regularly, starting within six months of the first tooth erupting, and at lease by age one. Pediatric dentists can detect small problems before they become bigger and more painful problems.

  • Floss Your Teeth: Kids should clean between their teeth once a day, every day, with floss or flossers to remove plaque and food where a toothbrush can’t reach. Teeth should be flossed as soon as two of their teeth touch each other.

  • Use Fluoride: Fluoride is nature’s cavity fighter and occurs naturally in water and some foods. To help protect teeth from cavities, fluoride is added to dental products like toothpaste. Children two years of age or older should always use a fluoride toothpaste.

  • Baby Tooth Decay Happens: As soon as teeth appear in your baby’s mouth, it’s possible for your baby to develop cavities. It is important to keep your baby’s gums and teeth clean to prevent tooth decay, even in baby teeth.

  • Prevent Kids’ Tooth Decay: You can prevent tooth decay for your kids by lowering the risk of your baby getting the bacteria that cause tooth decay. Make sure you take good care of your baby’s teeth – this reduces the number of bacteria in your baby’s mouth.

  • Nutrition: A balanced diet helps your children’s teeth and gums to be healthy. A diet high in natural or added sugars may place your child at extra risk for tooth decay.

    • A sugary or starchy food with sugar is safer for teeth if it is eaten with a meal, not as a snack. Chewing during a meal helps produce saliva which helps wash away sugar and starch.

    • Sticky food’s, like potato chips, raisins and other dried fruit and candy are not easily washed away from your kid’s teeth by saliva, water or milk, so they have more cavity-causing potential.

    • Talk to your dentist about serving foods that protect your kid’s dental health.

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/publications/publishing.nsf/Content/report_nacdh~report_nacdh_ch1~report_nacdh_out

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2010.200915

http://www.aapd.org/aapd_reminds_parents_and_caregivers_to_brush_childrens_teeth_two_minutes_twice_a_day_for_a_healthy_halloween/