My Blog

Posts for tag: bottles

 

We’ve all done it. You know you have. You put that new shirt on and see a tag. Instead of going to get the scissors, you just bite the plastic with your teeth. Or, you are sitting down to eat lunch and need to open a bag of chips. What better way to do it than with your teeth? There’s even the old party trick where someone shows everyone how they can pop the top off their bottle with their teeth. It’s true. Our teeth are amazing tools and they can accomplish lots of tasks. But, just because we can use them, does that mean that we should?

 

The truth is, while your teeth may be the easiest and most convenient tool for getting the job done, they are definitely not the best choice. In fact, doing anything other than chewing food with your teeth, can actually cause permanent damage and lead to long–term problems and costly dental treatments and repairs.

 

Chewing, chomping and tearing foreign objects with your teeth can chip or crack them. Aside from the aesthetic effects, a cracked tooth can be very painful and may need a root canal or crown. Ultimately, using your teeth as a shortcut can lead to a painful, timely and expensive dental experience.

 

So, while it may be tempting to use your teeth to tear or open something, reach for the scissors, bottle opener or appropriate tool instead. It’s important to teach your children to do the same. And remember, even chewing on hard food items, such as popcorn kernels, ice and hard candy can crack and damage your teeth.

 

Save your smile and use your teeth for chewing and smiling, not as tools.

 

As always, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants to give everyone Something to Smile About! If you have questions or concerns regarding your child’s teeth, or if they are experiencing pain from a chipped or cracked tooth, we encourage you to seek dental help immediately. Contact our office at 864-760-1440.

Don’t Drink in the Bed! - All About Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

 

Baby bottle tooth decay occurs when bacteria on the teeth, created from sugars in foods and beverages in the diet, form an acid that damages the tooth enamel. This acidic damage can lead to cavities and even infection and pain in your child.

 

Baby bottle tooth decay, or bottle mouth, gets it name from the prevalence of young children that suffer from cavities and decay primarily on their front top teeth, usually caused by going to sleep with a bottle or constantly drinking sugary beverages from a bottle. As the infant or child sucks the milk, juice, soda, etc., from a bottle, sugar sits on the front teeth, and bacteria use this sugar to form the acid that attacks the enamel.

 

If detected early, your pediatric dentist can apply a fluoride varnish to the affected areas to stop further damage. However, once the enamel has been severely damaged, and brown spots and cavities are visible, more restorative treatment will be needed.

 

Contrary to what many believe, baby teeth do matter. You don’t want your infant or young child to lose their teeth prematurely due to cavities. Baby teeth serve as placeholders for permanent teeth. When lost prematurely, the spacing of the permanent teeth can be affected, possibly leading to misaligned permanent teeth and the need for more extensive orthodontic treatment.  Young children that lose their baby teeth prematurely may also have a more difficult time eating a nutritious diet – and we all know that’s hard enough to do with all their teeth!

 

Tips for Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay:

 

  1. Never put your child to bed with a bottle or sippy cup containing anything but water.  (Even milk, formula and breast milk contain sugar that will cause the bacteria to create the acid that sits on the teeth and erodes the enamel.)

 

  1. Introduce a sippy cup to your child by 6 months old and try to ditch the bottle by 1 year old.

 

  1. Limit acidic foods in your child’s diet, especially juices.

 

  1. Brush your child’s teeth before bed or wipe your infant’s gums. Removing any sugar from the surface will help prevent bacteria from eating away at the enamel all night.

*Once you have brushed your child’s teeth before bed, only offer water to drink. If your child has a snack or drinks anything other than water, be sure to brush again!

As always, Anderson Pediatric Dentistry is here to help you with any questions you may have! Our dedicated team can help you come up with strategies for eliminating bedtime bottles and for preventing and treating tooth decay in your young children.