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Posts for: July, 2018

School is just weeks away. Soon, we will be looking at school supply lists, organizing backpacks and getting back in our early morning routines. We’ll also be packing lunches and planning quick breakfasts to help get everyone out the door. We’ll be quick to ensure our kids get plenty of sleep and do their homework, but there’s another factor that may have just as much of an impact on your child’s education and daily success- nutrition.

Most people understand the link between good nutrition and their child’s growth and development. But, studies are showing us that good nutrition has far reaching effects, beyond just helping your child grow bigger and stronger. A child’s diet can directly impact their education. With better nutrition, students are better able to learn, miss fewer days of school and have less behavior issues, all of which can directly affect their self-esteem and confidence.

While we know that too much sugar can cause behavior problems in most children, studies are also showing that deficiencies in key nutrients can also have negative impacts on a child’s ability to process and learn new information. For example, iron deficiency has been shown to negatively impact cognition. Deficiencies in other vitamins, amino acids and minerals are shown to impair concentration and cognitive abilities.

It goes without saying that good nutrition can also directly impact your child’s oral health. Teeth need a healthy diet to remain strong and cavity free. Children with poor oral health and cavities tend to miss more school days, which can impact both their grades and their social development.

The results of poor nutrition can create a ripple effect in a child’s life, as any child experiencing poor educational outcomes or constantly getting in trouble for behavior issues will soon feel the stigma of being labeled as a trouble maker or a child that isn’t trying. In the same way, a child who has poor oral health due to a sugary diet or nutritional deficits, may become insecure in social settings, feel uncomfortable smiling and lose confidence.

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants every child to thrive. We know that a good education is the building block to success and that every child deserves the ability to be successful. We support the efforts of organizations in our community that are dedicated to making sure children are fed, such as United Way’s snack pack program, and also encourage parents and caregivers to ensure that their child is receiving adequate nutrition to help them reach their full potential.

Every child deserves Something to Smile About!

 

For more information on the power of good nutrition, this article below is a great start.

http://articles.extension.org/pages/68774/3-ways-nutrition-influences-student-learning-potential-and-school-performance


By Anderson Pediatric Dentistry
July 22, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
ReadyforSummerCampBeSuretoPackaToothbrush

Summer is the time for many children to experience the fun and freedom of sleepaway camp. Along with greater independence, camp brings increased responsibility for kids to take care of themselves, including taking care of their oral health.

Two keys to dental health are a balanced diet and good oral hygiene, but camp life may tempt kids to overdo the kinds of food they don’t often indulge in at home. For most campers, enjoying s’mores around the fire is a given, but these marshmallowy treats pack a punch in the sugar department. In fact, a single s’more has half the daily limit of sugar recommended by the World Health Organization—and if the sweet treat’s name is any indication, no one stops at just one! Because sticky marshmallows are a central ingredient, they are worse for the teeth than many other sweets; the goo adheres to the surface of the teeth and gets stuck between teeth and braces, increasing the potential for tooth decay. Add in plenty of opportunities to consume sugary drinks and other treats throughout the week, and sleepaway camp can be a less-than-ideal environment to maintain good oral health, especially since brushing and flossing may not be a high priority with so much else going on.

You can help your camper feel more invested in their oral hygiene routine by involving them in as many preparations as possible, such as making a list of items to pack and shopping together for dental supplies. These can include a travel toothbrush with a case and a travel-sized tube of fluoride toothpaste—or a package of pre-pasted disposable toothbrushes. And don’t forget dental floss! You may also wish to include gum sweetened with xylitol, a natural sweetener that helps fight cavities. This could come in handy for those times your child gets too busy to brush.

Consider scheduling a teeth cleaning for the downtime after your child gets home from camp and before the start of the new school year, just in case your child wasn’t the most diligent about oral hygiene while away—and to ensure that they begin the new school year in the best oral health.

If you would like more information about how your child can maintain good oral health, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health” and “The Bitter Truth About Sugar.”


PracticeProactivePreventiontoEnhanceYourChildsDentalDevelopment

Like any parent you want your child to grow up healthy and strong. So be sure you don't neglect their dental care, a crucial part of overall health and well-being.

The most important part of this care is prevention — stopping dental disease and other problems before they do harm. Proactive prevention is the best way to keep their teeth and gum growth on the right track.

Prevention starts at home with a daily habit of brushing and later flossing. In the beginning, you'll have to brush for them, with just a smear of toothpaste on the toothbrush. As they get older, you can teach them to brush for themselves, graduating to a pea-sized dose of toothpaste.

It's also important to begin regular dental visits around their first birthday. Many of their primary (baby) teeth are coming in, so regular cleanings and checkups will help keep tooth decay in check. Early visits will also get them used to seeing the dentist and hopefully help stimulate a lifelong habit.

These visits have a number of purposes. First and foremost is to monitor dental development and early detection of any emerging problems, like a poor bite. Catching problems early could help reduce or even eliminate future treatment.

Some children are also at greater risk for tooth decay and could benefit from applications of topical fluoride, a mineral that strengthens tooth enamel, or a sealant to help protect the teeth. This is especially helpful in preserving primary (baby) teeth: early loss of a primary tooth could disrupt the permanent tooth's eruption and cause a poor bite.

Your child's dental visits could also benefit you as their caregiver. You receive regular feedback on how well your child's teeth and gums are developing, and the effectiveness of their oral hygiene. You also get answers to your questions about their oral health: the dentist's office is your best source for advice on teething, diet and other issues.

Together, you and your dentist can provide and maintain the best conditions for your child's dental development. The result will be the healthiest mouth they can have as they enter their adult years.

If you would like more information on preventive dentistry for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


July 09, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: kids teeth   Tips   Toddlers   prepare   dental appointments   anxiety   blog   crafts   fear   stress   experience   happy   teeth   cleaning   kids   parents  

 

So you looked at your calendar and realized that your child’s next dental appointment is coming up. Now, you are trying to mentally prepare both yourself and your child. How can you help ease your child’s anxiety and make this visit fun? There are lots of ways parents can help prepare their child for a dental visit, and believe it or not, parents can actually have the most influence on how their child will feel about their trip to the dentist.

 

What can you do to help make your child’s visit a great experience? We have some tips for you below.

 

~ Talk to your child. Explain to your child what a dentist is and why it’s important to take care of his/her teeth. Let them know what they can expect, such as the dentist looking in their mouth, brushing and flossing and even taking x-rays. Make sure that they know that the dentist is there to help them keep a beautiful smile.

 

~ Avoid negative words and talk. You may have had a painful toothache or have had extensive work done on your teeth, but try not to talk to your child about negative dental experiences.

 

~ Prepare with fun dental accessories like character toothbrushes or toothpaste. Kids love seeing their favorite characters, like princesses or cars, on their toothbrushes or toothpaste. If using a Trolls toothbrush makes brushing easier, by all means, use a Trolls toothbrush! Just make sure to choose items that have the ADA seal of approval on them to ensure safe and effective ingredients.

 

~ Read about the dentist. There are many great children books about visiting the dentist. Seeing their favorite characters successfully visit the dentist can help alleviate a child’s fears about their visit.

 

~ Watch a show. Again, there are great cartoons that focus on visits to the dentist. We have seen Barenstein Bears, Doc McStuffins, Mister Rogers, Bubble Guppies and several other popular cartoons that focus on visiting the dentist.

 

~ Encourage. Positive reinforcement goes a long way. Always tell your child how proud you are of them and what a big, brave boy/girl they are. New experiences can be scary and anytime they handle it well, we want to offer praise and encouragement.

 

~ Crafts. Pinterest and the internet are loaded with great dental-themed crafts. Many of these are also educational and can be used to help teach your child about dental health, brushing, flossing, etc. They are great boredom busters, but also, a great way to make dental visits seems less intimidating and more fun. Have your child make a dental craft and bring it in to the office to show the team!

 

Anderson Pediatric Dentistry wants both parents and their children to always feel safe and secure, respected and well cared for. If you have an upcoming visit and your child is experiencing anxiety, we are here to help ease the fear. Our goal is to help children have fun at the dentist. After all, we think we are kind of fun to be around! If you have questions or concerns about an upcoming visit, or would like to schedule your child’s first or next visit, call us at 864-760-1440. Let us give you and your child Something to Smile About!


By Anderson Pediatric Dentistry
July 02, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
JohnnysTeethArentRottenAnyMore

Everyone has to face the music at some time — even John Lydon, former lead singer of The Sex Pistols, arguably England’s best known punk rock band. The 59-year old musician was once better known by his stage name, Johnny Rotten — a brash reference to the visibly degraded state of his teeth. But in the decades since his band broke up, Lydon’s lifelong deficiency in dental hygiene had begun to cause him serious problems.

In recent years, Lydon has had several dental surgeries — including one to resolve two serious abscesses in his mouth, which left him with stitches in his gums and a temporary speech impediment. Photos show that he also had missing teeth, which, sources say, he opted to replace with dental implants.

For Lydon (and many others in the same situation) that’s likely to be an excellent choice. Dental implants are the gold standard for tooth replacement today, for some very good reasons. The most natural-looking of all tooth replacements, implants also have a higher success rate than any other method: over 95 percent. They can be used to replace one tooth, several teeth, or an entire arch (top or bottom row) of teeth. And with only routine care, they can last for the rest of your life.

Like natural teeth, dental implants get support from the bone in your jaw. The implant itself — a screw-like titanium post — is inserted into the jaw in a minor surgical operation. The lifelike, visible part of the tooth — the crown — is attached to the implant by a sturdy connector called an abutment. In time, the titanium metal of the implant actually becomes fused with the living bone tissue. This not only provides a solid anchorage for the prosthetic, but it also prevents bone loss at the site of the missing tooth — which is something neither bridgework nor dentures can do.

It’s true that implants may have a higher initial cost than other tooth replacement methods; in the long run, however, they may prove more economical. Over time, the cost of repeated dental treatments and periodic replacement of shorter-lived tooth restorations (not to mention lost time and discomfort) can easily exceed the expense of implants.

That’s a lesson John Lydon has learned. “A lot of ill health came from neglecting my teeth,” he told a newspaper reporter. “I felt sick all the time, and I decided to do something about it… I’ve had all kinds of abscesses, jaw surgery. It costs money and is very painful. So Johnny says: ‘Get your brush!’”

We couldn’t agree more. But if brushing isn’t enough, it may be time to consider dental implants. If you would like more information about dental implants, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implants” and “Save a Tooth or Get an Implant?